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Spotify to add advisories to podcasts discussing COVID-19

Jake Coyle, The Associated Press 3 minute read Sunday, Jan. 30, 2022

NEW YORK (AP) — Following protests of Spotify kicked off by Neil Young over the spread of COVID-19 vaccine misinformation, the music streaming service said that it will add content advisories before podcasts discussing the virus.

In a post Sunday, Spotify chief executive Daniel Ek laid out more transparent platform rules given the backlash stirred by Young, who on Wednesday had his music removed from Spotify after the tech giant declined to get rid of episodes of “The Joe Rogan Experience,” which has been criticized for spreading virus misinformation.

“Personally, there are plenty of individuals and views on Spotify that I disagree with strongly,” wrote Ek. “It is important to me that we don’t take on the position of being content censor while also making sure that there are rules in place and consequences for those who violate them.”

Ek said that the advisories will link to Spotify's fact-based COVID-19 hub in what he described as a “new effort to combat misinformation.” It will roll out in the coming days, Ek said. He did not specifically reference Rogan or Young.

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Easing painful goodbyes

Eliza McGraw 6 minute read Preview

Easing painful goodbyes

Eliza McGraw 6 minute read Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018

In December, Chelsea Lincoln’s pet rat, Juniper, developed an incurable tumour. Lincoln then faced every pet owner’s hardest realization. It was time to end Juniper’s struggle.

When the euthanasia appointment time arrived, however, Lincoln didn’t agonize with her ailing pet in a crowded reception area. Instead, she, along with Juniper and her partner, Rand Ryherd, both of Hillsboro, Ore., entered a “comfort room” furnished with soft couches, calming artwork and a plush rug. Lincoln and Ryherd said their goodbyes to Juniper, then summoned the veterinarian with an in-room phone. Sad as she was, Lincoln said, the experience was a relief — particularly after the long wait she’d endured when having Juniper’s sister, Holly, put down at another clinic.

Most U.S. pet owners have their ailing animals euthanized at veterinary offices, which are more widely available and typically less expensive than in-home euthanasia providers. But as house-call services have grown more popular, veterinary clinics have also sought to make end-of-life experiences more personal for both clients and pets, providing separate entrances, candles and soothing music among other touches.

“The home euthanasias are still growing, but clinics are starting to recognize more how important it is,” said veterinarian Mary Gardner, who co-founded the in-home euthanasia network Lap of Love and regularly gives talks at veterinary conferences. “And they’re stepping up now.”

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Sunday, Sep. 16, 2018

In December, Chelsea Lincoln’s pet rat, Juniper, developed an incurable tumour. Lincoln then faced every pet owner’s hardest realization. It was time to end Juniper’s struggle.

When the euthanasia appointment time arrived, however, Lincoln didn’t agonize with her ailing pet in a crowded reception area. Instead, she, along with Juniper and her partner, Rand Ryherd, both of Hillsboro, Ore., entered a “comfort room” furnished with soft couches, calming artwork and a plush rug. Lincoln and Ryherd said their goodbyes to Juniper, then summoned the veterinarian with an in-room phone. Sad as she was, Lincoln said, the experience was a relief — particularly after the long wait she’d endured when having Juniper’s sister, Holly, put down at another clinic.

Most U.S. pet owners have their ailing animals euthanized at veterinary offices, which are more widely available and typically less expensive than in-home euthanasia providers. But as house-call services have grown more popular, veterinary clinics have also sought to make end-of-life experiences more personal for both clients and pets, providing separate entrances, candles and soothing music among other touches.

“The home euthanasias are still growing, but clinics are starting to recognize more how important it is,” said veterinarian Mary Gardner, who co-founded the in-home euthanasia network Lap of Love and regularly gives talks at veterinary conferences. “And they’re stepping up now.”

How a prairie landlubber became known for her marine life pillows

David Sanderson 6 minute read Preview

How a prairie landlubber became known for her marine life pillows

David Sanderson 6 minute read Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018

Call me Ishmael. Or Doug.

Wendi Kuarsingh, the Wendi in Wendi Whale, a home décor biz that’s been making a bit of a splash of late, says people who buy one of her cuddly, whale-shaped throw pillows commonly grant it a name, the same way they would a teddy bear or doll. For instance, one woman recently sent Kuarsingh a note to let her know how much she was enjoying her purchase, which she’d affectionately dubbed Doug.

“She told me she looks forward to going home at the end of a long week, sitting on the couch with a glass of wine and telling Doug all her problems. ‘Best of all, he doesn’t talk back,’ she said.”

Kuarsingh, a married mother of two, guesses if her former home economics teacher at Steinbach Junior High School reads this story, she’s not going to believe it’s about the same person who, some 20 years ago, couldn’t sew a straight line if her life depended on it.

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Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018

Daniel Crump / Winnipeg Free Press
Wendi Kuarsingh (right) and her kids Esther (left) and Noah with a pile of Wendi Whales.

How to dump someone the humane way, according to science

Christopher Ingraham 4 minute read Preview

How to dump someone the humane way, according to science

Christopher Ingraham 4 minute read Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017

Planning on dumping a partner, firing an employee or otherwise delivering bad news to someone this week? A new Brigham Young University study offers advice on how to minimize the psychological damage you inflict when you drop a bombshell.

There are two schools of thought when it comes to the science of bad news. One holds you should soften the impact of the news by padding it with an “explanatory buffer,” laying out the case for what you’re about to say before you actually say it. Conversely, other research has found that you should just tear the Band-Aid off, delivering the bad news first and saving your commentary for afterward.

Professors Alan Manning of Brigham Young University and Nicole Amare of the University of South Alabama wanted to untangle part of this apparent contradiction. To do that, they administered a study to 145 undergraduates that involved A/B testing of a number of bad-news scenarios — such as warnings about physical danger and news of a bad medical diagnosis.

For instance, in one of the experiments, they asked participants to imagine they had been dating a person they liked for about a month and that they met up with that person in a café. They were then asked which of the two scenarios would be “least bothersome” to them.

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Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017

Planning on dumping a partner, firing an employee or otherwise delivering bad news to someone this week? A new Brigham Young University study offers advice on how to minimize the psychological damage you inflict when you drop a bombshell.

There are two schools of thought when it comes to the science of bad news. One holds you should soften the impact of the news by padding it with an “explanatory buffer,” laying out the case for what you’re about to say before you actually say it. Conversely, other research has found that you should just tear the Band-Aid off, delivering the bad news first and saving your commentary for afterward.

Professors Alan Manning of Brigham Young University and Nicole Amare of the University of South Alabama wanted to untangle part of this apparent contradiction. To do that, they administered a study to 145 undergraduates that involved A/B testing of a number of bad-news scenarios — such as warnings about physical danger and news of a bad medical diagnosis.

For instance, in one of the experiments, they asked participants to imagine they had been dating a person they liked for about a month and that they met up with that person in a café. They were then asked which of the two scenarios would be “least bothersome” to them.

‘I’m taking the dog’: when couples with pets break up

Sarah Polus 5 minute read Preview

‘I’m taking the dog’: when couples with pets break up

Sarah Polus 5 minute read Sunday, Sep. 17, 2017

Legally Blonde fans remember the scene where Reese Witherspoon’s character, Elle Woods, a Harvard law student, helps reunite her manicurist friend Paulette Belafonte (played by Jennifer Coolidge) with her bulldog, Rufus.

Standing at the door of the trailer Paulette and her ex-husband once shared, Elle lectures him about common-law marriage and the equitable division of the assets. “Huh?” he asks quizzically. “I’m taking the dog, dumbass,” Paulette yells as she grabs her beloved pooch and runs for the car.

It’s an iconic moment in rom-com movie history — and one that gets played out in similar ways all the time in real life when couples who own a dog together break up.

As couples now tend to put off marriage and children until later in life, getting a pet together has become a big step for many couples looking to advance their relationship.

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Sunday, Sep. 17, 2017

Helen Avery / The Associated Press Files
Couples who break up sometimes wage custody battles over their beloved furry child.

Bride shocked by Obamas’ response to wedding invite

Sarah Polus 2 minute read Preview

Bride shocked by Obamas’ response to wedding invite

Sarah Polus 2 minute read Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017

When you let your mom handle your wedding guest list, you never know who she’ll try to invite. Your grand aunt Marge’s first husband. The mailman. Maybe even the U.S. president and first lady.

Texas bride Brooke Allen was shocked to learn that her mom, Liz Whitlow, took the liberty of sending Michelle and Barack Obama an invite to her daughter’s March wedding back in December. Allen had no idea her mother had done so, until Whitlow shared the letter she had just received back, congratulating the couple.

“We hope that your marriage is blessed with love, laughter and happiness, and that your bond grows stronger with each passing year,” the card reads. “This occasion marks the beginning of a lifelong partnership and as you embark on this journey, know you have our very best for the many joys and adventures that lie ahead.”

Allen shared a picture of the note on Twitter, writing, “IM HOLLERING.”

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Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017

When you let your mom handle your wedding guest list, you never know who she’ll try to invite. Your grand aunt Marge’s first husband. The mailman. Maybe even the U.S. president and first lady.

Texas bride Brooke Allen was shocked to learn that her mom, Liz Whitlow, took the liberty of sending Michelle and Barack Obama an invite to her daughter’s March wedding back in December. Allen had no idea her mother had done so, until Whitlow shared the letter she had just received back, congratulating the couple.

“We hope that your marriage is blessed with love, laughter and happiness, and that your bond grows stronger with each passing year,” the card reads. “This occasion marks the beginning of a lifelong partnership and as you embark on this journey, know you have our very best for the many joys and adventures that lie ahead.”

Allen shared a picture of the note on Twitter, writing, “IM HOLLERING.”

Card-playing equals Wii for stroke recovery: study

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Card-playing equals Wii for stroke recovery: study

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Monday, Jun. 27, 2016

TORONTO - Simple recreational activities such as playing cards or repeatedly tossing a foam ball into a wastepaper basket are as effective as playing virtual reality games like Wii in helping patients recover hand strength and dexterity following a stroke, a Canadian-led study has found.

"We all like technology and have the tendency to think that new technology is better than old-fashioned strategies, but sometimes that's not the case," said Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, a neurologist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, who led the study published Monday in the journal Lancet Neurology.

"In this study, we found that simple recreational activities that can be implemented anywhere may be as effective as technology," he said.

"This is very important for access to care."

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Monday, Jun. 27, 2016

Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, a neurologist at St. Michael‚��s Hospital in Toronto, is shown in a handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-St. Michael‚��s Hospital MANDATORY CREDIT

Sweat lodge augments hospital's services

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Sweat lodge augments hospital's services

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Friday, Jun. 24, 2016

TORONTO - Canada's largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital has added a unique service for its aboriginal clients — a sweat lodge to help promote spiritual, physical and emotional healing.

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto unveiled the sweat lodge on a tucked-away section of its sprawling campus, fulfilling a goal set years ago to augment its services for indigenous clients by adding the ceremonial structure.

"Having the sweat lodge on-site at CAMH is going to allow us to offer indigenous healing ceremonies as part of the treatment plans," Renee Linklater, director of aboriginal engagement and outreach, said in an interview prior to Thursday's official opening.

"This is going to be really important in our efforts to address what is appropriate aboriginal client care."

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Friday, Jun. 24, 2016

Rob Wemigwans, a therapist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health demonstrates how he introduces himself before entering a sweat lodge following the opening of a sweat lodge/sacred fire on the grounds of CAMH in Toronto on Thursday, June 23, 2016. The new facilities are to be used in the healing process for aboriginal clients with mental health and addiction issues. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Smoothie bowl recipes: Basic, mocha almond, green coconut

The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Smoothie bowl recipes: Basic, mocha almond, green coconut

The Canadian Press 4 minute read Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

Shake up breakfast with a smoothie bowl. The combinations are endless.

It's easy. Make a smoothie, but reduce the fluid content so it's extra thick. Pour it in a small bowl and add toppings, so you're eating rather than drinking your meal. It's similar to cereal and milk, but without any processed or refined grains, and with an infusion of whole-food nuts, seeds and fruit, says registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom.

Even though the ingredients are healthy, she cautions that eating large quantities can provide too many calories. Use a small bowl and limit the toppings. For children, use a 250-ml (1-cup) serving bowl for the smoothie, and top it with 15 ml (1 tbsp) each of nuts, seeds and fruit. That will make a well-rounded kid-sized breakfast (about 300 calories).

Elaine Nessman, who writes the blog Flavour and Savour, provides this checklist of smoothie components. Choose your favourites:

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Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

This mocha almond smoothie bowl, shown, is brimming with almond milk and chia seeds, sweetened with dates and gets a kick from coffee, says recipe creator Elaine Nessman of Cowichan Valley, Vancouver Island, who shares it on her food blog Flavour and Savour. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ HO, Elaine Nessman *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Colourful smoothie bowls take over social media

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Colourful smoothie bowls take over social media

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

TORONTO - People who crave more crunch and texture in a smoothie are swapping straws for spoons and eating the ingredients out of a bowl.

Colourful smoothie bowls — basically a concoction of a fruit and vegetable puree topped by an arrangement of fresh fruit, nuts and seeds — are artful creations being eagerly shared by their creators on social media.

"They're beautiful to photograph and people are so into photographing their food these days, sharing it on Pinterest or Instagram, so something that doesn't require a lot of effort, tastes good and is easy on the eyes, looks good in a photograph, you've got a win there," says registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom.

They're also a healthy way to eat, says Elaine Nessman, who shares her smoothie bowl creations — strawberry chia, tropical turmeric, carrot cake and mocha almond are some examples — on her blog Flavour and Savour.

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Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

A smoothie bowl is shown in this undated handout photo. People who crave more crunch and texture in a smoothie are swapping straws for spoons and eating the ingredients out of a bowl. Colourful smoothie bowls are artful creations being eagerly shared by their creators on social media. HO, Cara Rosenbloom, Words to Eat By Nutrition Communications *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Canada's 1st hand transplant patient now feels 'whole'

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 7 minute read Preview

Canada's 1st hand transplant patient now feels 'whole'

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 7 minute read Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

TORONTO - In January, Toronto surgeons announced they had performed Canada's first hand and forearm transplant. Now, the woman at the centre of that groundbreaking surgery is going public, sharing the journey that has once again made her feel whole.

It's a story of faith, determination, and a belief that the miracles of medicine could wipe out the pain of the past and give her a brighter future.

In 2005, Maryam Zolfi's world was forever altered when her left arm was severed below the elbow in a horrific car accident. Three years later, the registered nurse was back at work, wearing an artificial arm that was cosmetic but non-functional.

"It was very difficult," the 50-year-old confided in an interview this week at Toronto Western Hospital.

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Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

Maryam Zolfi, who had a successful arm transplant, poses for a picture showing her right hand resting on top of her transplanted arm, at Toronto Western Hospital, in Toronto, Monday June 20, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

Gen X snapping up cottages: Royal LePage

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

Gen X snapping up cottages: Royal LePage

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

TORONTO - A new report from realtor Royal LePage says members of so-called Generation X are buying twice as many cottages as Baby Boomers.

The report says retirement planning and vacationing are among the reasons most often cited by those looking to purchase recreational properties.

Royal LePage says the typical cottage buyer is a couple with children, most likely in the Generation X demographic, which the report defines as those aged 36 to 51.

The report defines Baby Boomers as those between 52 and 70.

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Thursday, Jun. 23, 2016

TORONTO - A new report from realtor Royal LePage says members of so-called Generation X are buying twice as many cottages as Baby Boomers.

The report says retirement planning and vacationing are among the reasons most often cited by those looking to purchase recreational properties.

Royal LePage says the typical cottage buyer is a couple with children, most likely in the Generation X demographic, which the report defines as those aged 36 to 51.

The report defines Baby Boomers as those between 52 and 70.

Food landscape in Canada unhealthy: researcher

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Food landscape in Canada unhealthy: researcher

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2016

TORONTO - Canada's food landscape is becoming awash in swamps, or areas where there's an overabundance of unhealthy items, says a University of Saskatchewan professor.

And no matter where in Canada you live or what your income level is, accessing healthy food is not always easy, says Rachel Engler-Stringer.

"Think about your day-to-day movement throughout the neighbourhood or the city or wherever you go. How many times do you encounter chocolate bars, potato chips, pop?" Engler-Stringer says from Saskatoon.

"We're at the point now where you can't even go to a car mechanic without there being chocolate bars on the counter. They're literally absolutely everywhere and our grocery stores are heavily dominated by foods that are not considered healthy.

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Wednesday, Jun. 22, 2016

TORONTO - Canada's food landscape is becoming awash in swamps, or areas where there's an overabundance of unhealthy items, says a University of Saskatchewan professor.

And no matter where in Canada you live or what your income level is, accessing healthy food is not always easy, says Rachel Engler-Stringer.

"Think about your day-to-day movement throughout the neighbourhood or the city or wherever you go. How many times do you encounter chocolate bars, potato chips, pop?" Engler-Stringer says from Saskatoon.

"We're at the point now where you can't even go to a car mechanic without there being chocolate bars on the counter. They're literally absolutely everywhere and our grocery stores are heavily dominated by foods that are not considered healthy.

Dos and don'ts of shopping at farmers markets

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

Dos and don'ts of shopping at farmers markets

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Monday, Jun. 20, 2016

TORONTO - Farmers markets might be intimidating for those used to whipping around large supermarkets with a list in hand.

But most shoppers become hooked by the array of the freshest food available and the chance to discuss with the actual producers where it came from.

"It's just different than going to a grocery store. People may not really get that realization of how different it really is if you've never been before," says Eileen Kotowich, farmers market specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, which recently launched a smartphone app with information on just over 130 markets around the province.

Here are some dos and don'ts of visiting farmers markets from Kotowich and Matt Gomez, founder of Soil Mate, an online tool that connects consumers in Canada and the U.S. with local food and drink growers, raisers, producers and supporters.

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Monday, Jun. 20, 2016

People shop at various vendors at the Millarville farmers' market South of Calgary in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Teen phenom Vejas Kruszewski sets sights on expansion

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Teen phenom Vejas Kruszewski sets sights on expansion

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Monday, Jun. 20, 2016

TORONTO - Self-taught phenom fashion designer Vejas Kruszewski is not the kind of artist prone to outbursts of glee.

Even after winning a prestigious fashion prize awarded by heavyweights including Karl Lagerfeld and Marc Jacobs, the low-key Canadian teen prefers to focus on the pragmatic issues at hand.

"It feels good. But it's over now so it's kind of back to work," Kruszewski said Monday from Paris, where he last week won the prize, which comes with a cheque for 150,000 euros (C$217,000) and a year-long mentorship.

"We have to meet with the mentor and put together a plan with how things are going to go forward and we're just going to think on the best possible trajectory to go in."

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Monday, Jun. 20, 2016

Canadian designer Vejas Kruszewski of VEJAS poses at the LVMH Prize ceremony in Paris in this June 16, 2016 handout photo. Self-taught phenom fashion designer Vejas Kruszewski is not the kind of artist prone to outbursts of glee. Even after winning a prestigious fashion prize awarded by heavyweights including Karl Lagerfeld and Marc Jacobs, the low-key Canadian teen prefers to focus on the pragmatic issues at hand. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Benoit Peverelli *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Surrey, B.C., students to celebrate pride prom

Linda Givetash, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Surrey, B.C., students to celebrate pride prom

Linda Givetash, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

SURREY, B.C. - School may be out, but Alisa Atchison has one more art project to complete. The 14-year-old from Surrey, B.C., will be spending her first weekend of the summer making a butterfly themed mask to wear to her school district's first-ever pride prom.

"I always thought that butterflies were really free ... and they're beautiful," she said. "I want to be free and beautiful as well."

Guildford Park Secondary School's gay-straight alliance is hosting the inaugural district-wide dance on Monday evening to give LGBTQ students from different high schools a chance to meet, have fun and feel supported.

"Each student is on their own path and in a different place when it comes to self-acceptance, or being out or not, or figuring out who they are and I think creating that safe space where you can just be who you are, whoever that is, is really, really important," said Guildford Park teacher Heather Kelley.

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Sunday, Jun. 19, 2016

SURREY, B.C. - School may be out, but Alisa Atchison has one more art project to complete. The 14-year-old from Surrey, B.C., will be spending her first weekend of the summer making a butterfly themed mask to wear to her school district's first-ever pride prom.

"I always thought that butterflies were really free ... and they're beautiful," she said. "I want to be free and beautiful as well."

Guildford Park Secondary School's gay-straight alliance is hosting the inaugural district-wide dance on Monday evening to give LGBTQ students from different high schools a chance to meet, have fun and feel supported.

"Each student is on their own path and in a different place when it comes to self-acceptance, or being out or not, or figuring out who they are and I think creating that safe space where you can just be who you are, whoever that is, is really, really important," said Guildford Park teacher Heather Kelley.

The future of online grocery shopping in Canada

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

The future of online grocery shopping in Canada

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Thursday, Jun. 16, 2016

TORONTO - Major grocery store chains continue to expand their online shopping offerings as Canadians become more amenable to buying food on the Internet.

Loblaw launched its click-and-collect program that allows customers to order their groceries online and pick them up at a store in the fall of 2014. The service is now available at 60 Loblaw stores, said Jeremy Pee, the company's senior vice-president of e-commerce.

The company plans to add another 20 stores over the next couple of months, he said, in Calgary, Winnipeg, the greater Toronto area, Saskatoon and throughout B.C.

Currently, stores under its Loblaws, Zehrs, Real Canadian Superstore and Wholesale Club banners are the only ones where the program has been rolled out. But the grocery retailer plans to include some of its other banners in the future, Pee said, though that rollout plan doesn't include Shoppers Drug Mart.

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Thursday, Jun. 16, 2016

Grant Bone, Department Manager for Loblaw's 'Click and Collect' gathers a customer's order at one of the grocery chain's outlets in Toronto on Thursday, June 16, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Canadian designer Vejas wins special prize from LVMH Prize

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

Canadian designer Vejas wins special prize from LVMH Prize

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Thursday, Jun. 16, 2016

PARIS - Canadian designer Vejas Kruszewski has won a special award from the LVMH Prize for young fashion designers.

The 19-year-old behind Toronto-based label Vejas has been awarded 150,000 euros, or approximately C$218,000.

Kruszewski also received a year-long mentorship from the LVMH Group, the luxury goods conglomerate which includes fashion brands Louis Vuitton, Celine and Givenchy and awards the annual prize.

The self-taught designer launched his eponymous label with his first collection at New York Fashion Week last year.

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Thursday, Jun. 16, 2016

Canadian designer Vejas Kruszewski is seen in this undated handout photo. Kruszewski has won a special prize from the LVMH Prize for young fashion designers.THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Samuel Francis Houston MANDATORY CREDIT

Recipes to help beat the heat

The Canadian Press 6 minute read Preview

Recipes to help beat the heat

The Canadian Press 6 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

Even with air conditioning, the last thing you want to do during the summer is turn on your oven and heat up your home. Here are some seasonal recipes that can be prepared with minimal effort and maximum flavour.

TOFU CAPRESE STACK

This fun salad is a riff on a traditional Italian salad. It's a no-cook, easy appetizer with few ingredients — bocconcini cheese, tofu, tomato and basil — that are layered and drizzled with vinaigrette.

"Instead of using only bocconcini cheese, we alternate it and tofu because they're both white and can both be cut into rounds so they look identical," says registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom.

Read
Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

Even with air conditioning, the last thing you want to do during the summer is turn on your oven and heat up your home. Here are some seasonal recipes that can be prepared with minimal effort and maximum flavour.

TOFU CAPRESE STACK

This fun salad is a riff on a traditional Italian salad. It's a no-cook, easy appetizer with few ingredients — bocconcini cheese, tofu, tomato and basil — that are layered and drizzled with vinaigrette.

"Instead of using only bocconcini cheese, we alternate it and tofu because they're both white and can both be cut into rounds so they look identical," says registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom.

Tips for cooking meals without the oven on hot days

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Tips for cooking meals without the oven on hot days

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

TORONTO - When it's hot and humid out, it's natural to skip right over recipes that start with "Preheat oven to ..."

But there are myriad ways to inject great flavour and nutrition into meals without heating up your home.

Registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom says sandwiches and salads based on seasonal ingredients are a perfect starting point.

"Especially when they're fresh and at their best flavour-wise, farm-fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers sliced up and thrown together in a salad with a little bit of olive oil and a little bit of salt is absolutely delicious," says Rosenbloom.

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Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

The cover of "Rush Hour Meals" by Rose Reisman is seen in an undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Whitecap Books - MANDATORY CREDIT

Ontario asked to fight chronic disease among aboriginals

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

Ontario asked to fight chronic disease among aboriginals

The Canadian Press 2 minute read Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

TORONTO - Cancer Care Ontario is calling on the province to take urgent action to help a number of chronic health problems among aboriginal communities.

The organization says rates of disease are higher among first nations, Inuit and Metis populations than their non-aboriginal counterparts.

They say 63 per cent of First Nations people living off reserve and 61 per cent of Metis suffer from one or more chronic conditions, compared to 47 per cent of the general population.

Cancer Care Ontario is recommending policies the Ontario government could put in place to combat diabetes, heart disease, cancer and respiratory disease.

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Wednesday, Jun. 15, 2016

TORONTO - Cancer Care Ontario is calling on the province to take urgent action to help a number of chronic health problems among aboriginal communities.

The organization says rates of disease are higher among first nations, Inuit and Metis populations than their non-aboriginal counterparts.

They say 63 per cent of First Nations people living off reserve and 61 per cent of Metis suffer from one or more chronic conditions, compared to 47 per cent of the general population.

Cancer Care Ontario is recommending policies the Ontario government could put in place to combat diabetes, heart disease, cancer and respiratory disease.

Gay men still face blood donor ban

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Gay men still face blood donor ban

Sheryl Ubelacker, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Tuesday, Jun. 14, 2016

TORONTO - In the aftermath of Sunday's massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, blood collection clinics were overwhelmed with people volunteering to roll up their sleeves to donate the gift of life.

Yet many among the most motivated — men who have sex with men — were ineligible because of criteria meant to protect the blood supply from HIV, despite rigorous testing of every donation.

In the U.S., men who have sex with men are prohibited from donating blood within a year of their last sexual encounter. Canada's current system is even more restrictive, banning blood donations from men who engage in same-sex relations for five years, though that's a far cry from the lifetime exclusion enacted during the height of the AIDS crisis in the early 1980s.

Michael Bach, founder and CEO of the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion, said his Toronto-based organization is campaigning to have the deferral period lifted, arguing it's discriminatory and not based on a growing body of scientific evidence suggesting a minimal risk to the blood supply.

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Tuesday, Jun. 14, 2016

Donors line up outside OneBlood Blood Donation Center in Orlando, Fla., on Sunday, June 12, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Loren Elliott/Tampa Bay Times via AP

Celine Dion to launch debut lifestyle brand

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Preview

Celine Dion to launch debut lifestyle brand

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Friday, Jun. 10, 2016

HOLLYWOOD, Calif. - Celine Dion is foraying into fashion with her first-ever lifestyle collection.

The Canadian pop superstar has inked a multi-year agreement to launch Celine Dion lifestyle products and services.

Dion will partner with licensing firm Epic Rights and strategic management conglomerate Prominent Brand+Talent to create and launch the line in tandem with retailers and licensees.

In addition to fashion and accessories, the collection will include health and beauty product categories and home furnishings.

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Friday, Jun. 10, 2016

Celine Dion performs �€œThe Show Must Go On�€� at the Billboard Music Awards at the T-Mobile Arena on Sunday, May 22, 2016, in Las Vegas. Celine Dion is foraying into fashion with her first-ever lifestyle collection. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Invision, AP, Chris Pizzello

Advocates tout the benefits of grass-fed beef

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

Advocates tout the benefits of grass-fed beef

Lois Abraham, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Thursday, Jun. 9, 2016

TORONTO - Shopping for steaks to grill and confused by the difference between grass-fed and grain-fed beef? And why is one more expensive?

A Toronto-based butcher who stocks 100 per cent grass-fed beef argues cows that graze on grass are healthier and their meat contains less fat than their counterparts eating grain or corn.

"Their digestive systems are meant to consume grass, not grains and corn," says Mario Fiorucci, co-owner of the Healthy Butcher. "It's not healthy for them and the result is not healthy for us. You are what you eat and so is the animal."

Richard Bazinet, associate professor in the department of nutritional sciences at the University of Toronto, analyzed the fat content of 14 steaks purchased at outlets around the city last summer.

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Thursday, Jun. 9, 2016

Mario Fiorucci (left), co-owner of the Healthy Butcher and Dave Meli, co-owner and head butcher sell 100 per cent grass-fed beef in their two Toronto stores and one in Kitchener, Ont. Here they visit some grass-fed cattle in Ontario. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO – Healthy Butcher MANDATORY CREDIT

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