Legislature land acknowledgement set for Monday

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An Indigenous land acknowledgement will open question period at the Manitoba Legislative Building for the first time, on Monday.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 26/11/2021 (257 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

An Indigenous land acknowledgement will open question period at the Manitoba Legislative Building for the first time, on Monday.

Government house leader Kelvin Goertzen tabled the new treaty and territorial acknowledgement Friday.

Legislators unanimously agreed to adopt the statement to be used daily, alongside the prayer, for the remainder of the session.

THE CANADIAN PRESS FILES/John Woods An Indigenous land acknowledgement will open question period at the Manitoba Legislative Building for the first time, on Monday.

Premier Heather Stefanson said the land acknowledgement will be formalized at a later date as part of the house rules.

“I feel very honoured and humbled to be the premier of this province when this is starting,” Stefanson said Friday. “It’s the right thing to do and I’m just looking forward to that.”

The legislative assembly is one of the few public institutions in the province that doesn’t open with a land acknowledgement.

The NDP has called for a land acknowledgement to be included in the proceedings since 2017.

In September, a government working group was directed to consult with First Nations, Métis and Inuit leaders and organizations and provide recommendations to the government. A draft of the statement was shared with house leaders Wednesday for fine-tuning.

Stefanson said Indigenous leaders and members will be invited to the legislature on Monday to hear it read into the chamber for the first time.

The four-sentence land acknowledgement recognizes the treaty territories and ancestral lands of the Anishinaabeg, Anishininewuk, Dakota Oyate, Denesuline and Nehethowuk nations; the homeland of the Red River Métis; the ancestral lands of the Inuit; affirms respect for the spirit and intent of treaties; and contains a commitment to working in partnership with Indigenous peoples in the spirit of “truth, reconciliation, and collaboration.”

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