Energy efficiency in the egg industry

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Sandra and Eric Dyck are registered egg farmers, reducing their environmental footprint on 4-D Farms in Springstein, Manitoba. The Dyck family installed more than 500 feet of solar panels, which produce solar kilowatts that work to power their farm and home. The decision to install the panels was made to decrease their farm’s carbon footprint and to offset electricity costs for their farming operation. Their family has been farming in Springstein for nearly 100 years, and Eric is a fourth-generation farmer and third-generation egg farmer. The family has 4,800 laying hens in an enriched housing system, and the whole family, including their three children Jacob (13), Levi (11) and Rylee (9), helps pack eggs by hand each day.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 16/04/2022 (298 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Sandra and Eric Dyck are registered egg farmers, reducing their environmental footprint on 4-D Farms in Springstein, Manitoba. The Dyck family installed more than 500 feet of solar panels, which produce solar kilowatts that work to power their farm and home. The decision to install the panels was made to decrease their farm’s carbon footprint and to offset electricity costs for their farming operation. Their family has been farming in Springstein for nearly 100 years, and Eric is a fourth-generation farmer and third-generation egg farmer. The family has 4,800 laying hens in an enriched housing system, and the whole family, including their three children Jacob (13), Levi (11) and Rylee (9), helps pack eggs by hand each day.

“Our laying hen barn is pretty efficient with energy consumption, and we have taken simple steps like installing LED lights throughout the barn to decrease our energy usage,” said Sandra.

The solar panels produce electricity that powers the hens’ feeding system, ensuring that fresh food and water is always available. Energy gathered off the solar grid powers the fans, providing fresh air to the barn, and powers a conveyor belt system that collects eggs each morning, bringing them from the barn to the gathering and packing room. The solar panels also power the manure removal system, ensuring the hens are kept in a clean and healthy environment.

“Most years, our panels produce enough power to carry us from April to October, depending on the sunshine. This past year our home was completely powered for 10 months of the year,” said Sandra.

The Dyck family sees the importance and benefit energy efficiency has brought to their diverse farming operation, which includes hens, grain, crops and bees. Their solar panels help provide power to the hen barn, the aeration system of their grain bins and temperature-controlled bee storage. 

Regulated egg farmers like Sandra and Eric Dyck are making huge strides in greening the egg industry. In fact, the environmental footprint of Canada’s egg production supply chain declined by almost 50 per cent between 1962 and 2012, while egg production increased by 50 per cent. In that timeframe, the Canadian egg industry used 81 per cent less land, 41 per cent less energy and 69 per cent less water. The industry produced 61 per cent fewer emissions that contribute to acid rain, 68 per cent fewer emissions of nitrogen and phosphorus and 72 per cent fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Laying hens themselves have been doing their part, as their feed efficiency or ability to convert feed into a source of protein is remarkable. On average, for every 1.7 kilogram of feed, a hen produces one kilogram of high-protein eggs.

The Dyck family is proud to provide Manitobans with nutritious, locally produced eggs. They look forward to egg farming with their family for many years to come.

Eggs…locally produced, nutritious, affordable

The eggs available in Manitoba grocery stores are produced by local egg farmers like the Dyck family of Springstein, Manitoba. Regulated egg farmers meet high standards in food safety and hen care.

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