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City of Winnipeg to seek more transitional housing

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Winnipeg city council has unanimously voted to seek more affordable housing options, after the demise of a call to remove key elements from two Transit bus shelters.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 21/07/2022 (195 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Winnipeg city council has unanimously voted to seek more affordable housing options, after the demise of a call to remove key elements from two Transit bus shelters.

Last month, council shelved a motion to remove the glass walls, doors, seats and electrical units from the shelters in front of Kildonan Place on Regent Avenue, which aimed to prevent unsheltered Winnipeggers from spending lengths of time in the structures.

Coun. Shawn Nason originally argued that change was needed to address drug use, garbage and other safety risks plaguing the bus shacks, but later backed down. Dozens of individuals and organizations serving homeless Winnipeggers lashed out at the move as merely displacing the most vulnerable residents.

MIKE DEAL / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS FILES Last month, council shelved a motion to remove the glass walls, doors, seats and electrical units from the shelters in front of Kildonan Place on Regent Avenue, which aimed to prevent unsheltered Winnipeggers from spending lengths of time in the structures.

On Thursday, council instead approved a motion to have the public service develop options to create at least 150 low-barrier units, specifically aimed at providing housing for those “sleeping rough” or staying at encampments and/or bus shelters.

City to pursue sustainable procurement

The City of Winnipeg will aim to use its buying power to better the community.

On Thursday, council cast a final vote to implement a sustainable procurement action blueprint.

The city will implement changes over three years that can help Winnipeggers overcome employment barriers and get hired, and/or achieve other key social and environmental goals.

Deal approved for some fire paramedics

Three years of wage hikes are on the way for members of the Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Senior Officers’ Association.

Council voted in favour of a new tentative agreement with the union Thursday, which will provide its members a two per cent general wage hike in each of 2022 and 2023, followed by 1.9 per cent in 2024.

Police station budget hike approved

The cost to construct the North District Police Station will be $6-million higher, after council approved the revised budget Thursday.

The price to build the new station at 100 Sinclair St. will rise to $31.7 million from $25.7 million, primarily due to soaring construction costs and supply chain issues.

The new station will replace the 260 Hartford Ave. location.

Sights set on strategic plan for road safety

The City of Winnipeg will spend $22 million over five years on a road safety strategic action plan, which aims to reduce serious injuries and deaths caused by traffic collisions.

The new plan sets a target to reduce the number of fatal and serious injury collisions by 20 per cent over the next five years.

It suggests the city add more 30-km/h speed limits at neighbourhood greenways (which are meant to safely serve all forms of traffic), review overall speed limits, add more traffic calming measures (such as speed humps or roundabouts) and create public education on road safety, among several other steps.

Sidewalk snow clearing pushed up

A plan to clear sidewalks of ice and snow quicker in future winters has been approved by council, minus an original recommendation to have private contractors do more of the work.

On Thursday, council approved a call to spend $3 million on 15 more sidewalk-clearing machines but rejected a recommendation to also contract out an additional 500 kilometres of sidewalk plowing.

The city will instead enter discussions with its unions on that topic, to determine what cost city workers can provide the same service and how the city should best proceed.

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