WEATHER ALERT

Bicycle business booming Pandemic fuels surge in bike sales with some shops running out of stock

Unlike some retailers who are worrying about how to convince people to come back to the stores, bike shops are facing a whole other problem – running out of stock.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 19/05/2020 (931 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Unlike some retailers who are worrying about how to convince people to come back to the stores, bike shops are facing a whole other problem – running out of stock.

Demand is not the problem. Bike shops that have been around for decades are experiencing something they have never seen before – people queuing up to get in. But some are worried about what they’ll have left to sell as the summer months kick in.

The line-ups are partly a result of the social distancing regulations once they are in the store, but demand for all things biking is spiking.

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Brian Burke, owner of Olympia Cycle and Ski on St. Mary’s Road, is seeing a boost in business during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Riding a bicycle sits in one of the few sweet spots in the world of COVID-19-enforced social distancing, but shop owners are having to deal with the extra pressures of keeping their workplace up to the new workplace safety and health standards as well as dealing with a surge in cycling enthusiasm.

“I don’t think you can find many ladies bikes in the whole city,” said Brian Burke long time owner of Olympia Cycle & Ski on St. Mary’s Road. “I have sold out and re-ordered and then sold them out even before they arrived.”

Like many other popular consumer goods, bicycle manufacturing has succumbed to the global supply chain that is now almost exclusively based in Asia.

“I don’t think you can find many ladies bikes in the whole city. I have sold out and re-ordered and then sold them out even before they arrived.”
– Brian Burke, owner of Olympia Cycle & Ski

Tim Woodcock, owner of Woodcock Cycle Works, said, “It doesn’t matter if the bike is made in Taiwan or Bangladesh or Vietnam, most of the parts come from China.”

Shipments of all things from China was disrupted months ago by the coronavirus lock down that happened there first and shipments have still not caught up.

Coupled with the fact prime biking weather is now upon us, more people have more time to ride. That means shop owners are scrambling to deal with unusual confluence of high demand, limited supply and the unusual scenario where they can only have so many people in the stores at once.

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS The work bench in Brian Burke’s Olympia Cycle and Ski shop. Some bike shops are being forced to carry brands they aren’t used to because their suppliers are running out of inventory.

“I’m a little stressed,” Woodcock said.

He said he prides himself and his store on being focused on customer service and now he’s forced to make people wait outside. And there’s then the added pressure of discouraging excessive window shopping, what with the line-ups outside.

Claude Brunel, owner of Lifesport on Henderson Highway could barely stop to take a call from a reporter.

“I can’t get bikes, that’s the problem,” he said. “All the bikes are made in China.”

Woodcock, who acts as an advisor to a Chinese bicycle manufacturer, had good perspective on market development early on and made the decision to stock up on supply, ordering more earlier in the year than he typically might.

“I can’t get bikes, that’s the problem. All the bikes are made in China.”
– Claude Brunel, owner of Lifesport on Henderson Highway

“There’s normally three major shipping windows,” he said. “We realized by the time the second and third shipping window came along vendors probably would not be able to supply us. So we took as many as we could to have them later if there was a shortage. Now we are starting to see those shortages.”

But even with that kind of planning, Woodcock said they are still scrambling to keep bikes on the shop floor.

Most shops are operating on reduced hours, and it may be just as well, because it gives them the chance to have mechanics in at night assembling bikes and also dealing with the overwhelming demand for repairs.

“We’re getting bikes (to repair) that don’t look like they have been on the road for 20 years,” Woodcock said.

At Olympia, Burke said he’s been hiring repair people who are working every night from 5:00-to-10:00 p.m.

“We have adapted,” he said. “You have to adapt.”

Walter Jozwiak, owner of Lifesport on Pembina Highway, said the supply crunch is unprecedented.

“It’s like selling Coca Cola and you’ve run out of Coke,” he said. “I was saying to one of my staff, what am I going to do two weeks from now?”

In addition to running out of women’s bikes, popular-priced models, between $500 and $800, are what people are looking to buy. Many say the “exotic” bikes that can cost as much as $4,000 are not what people are looking to buy.

“It is a problem for everybody in the industry,” Jozwiak said. “We didn’t realize the general population would need something to do and this is one of the few activities that they can do in a safe mode. That’s what’s happening.”

martin.cash@freepress.mb.ca

Martin Cash

Martin Cash
Reporter

Martin Cash has been writing a column and business news at the Free Press since 1989. Over those years he’s written through a number of business cycles and the rise and fall (and rise) in fortunes of many local businesses.

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