Canada

Family of Tyre Nichols pleads for calm as U.S. confronts ‘horrifying’ video evidence

James McCarten, The Canadian Press 7 minute read Yesterday at 12:55 PM CST

WASHINGTON - The grieving family of Tyre Nichols called for calm across the United States on Friday as a country racked by racial and cultural divisions witnessed for itself visceral new video evidence of another young Black man enduring brutal, deadly violence at the hands of police.

Authorities in Memphis, Tenn., released a series of video clips — an hour-long compilation of footage and audio from body-worn police cameras as well as a static mounted security camera — depicting the traffic stop, foot chase and street-corner takedown that ultimately led to the 29-year-old man's death.

The video, widely vilified by officials before its public release and likened to the explosive 1991 police beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles, shows Nichols fleeing the scene of the initial stop, then later enduring a savage series of punches, kicks and blows from a retractable police baton.

Anticipation surrounding the video evoked the national mood after the death of George Floyd during a violent takedown in Minneapolis in 2020 that sparked a months-long reckoning with racial tension and police brutality, as well as persistent and sometimes violent protests in cities across the country.

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There’s a hungry Arctic predator with a lot of arms that eats polar bears

Brieanna Charlebois, The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

There’s a hungry Arctic predator with a lot of arms that eats polar bears

Brieanna Charlebois, The Canadian Press 2 minute read 3:00 AM CST

On the Arctic sea floor lie hungry predators that can eat polar bears.

The voracious carnivores are seastars, better known as starfish, and a new study by a national research group says they tie with polar bears as the top predators of the Arctic marine ecosystem.

Co-author Remi Amiraux, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Manitoba, said sea floor, or benthic, organisms are not commonly studied because they are often assumed to be lower on the food chain.

But the study published last month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that the ocean floor includes organisms across the whole range of the food chain.

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3:00 AM CST

Thousands of small starfish wash ashore during low tide on Garden City Beach, S.C., Monday, June 29, 2020. A Canadian national research group says it has proven that seastars are tied with polar bears as the top predator of the coastal Arctic marine ecosystem. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Jason Lee/The Sun News via AP

Inflation-focused Pierre Poilievre back to Parliament as health-care talks loom

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

Inflation-focused Pierre Poilievre back to Parliament as health-care talks loom

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press 5 minute read 5:00 AM CST

OTTAWA - It's no secret what Pierre Poilievre thinks about government spending and inflation.

Same with guns.

But what does the Conservative leader think should happen when premiers ask for billions more in federal health transfers?

With a deal under negotiation between Ottawa and provinces, and premiers invited to a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in early February, the issue remains one where the Tory leader's position appears somewhat murky, including to some inside his own party.

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5:00 AM CST

Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre speaks to caucus Friday, January 27, 2023 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

WHO decision on COVID-19 emergency won’t effect Canada’s response: Tam

Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

WHO decision on COVID-19 emergency won’t effect Canada’s response: Tam

Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Yesterday at 1:42 PM CST

OTTAWA - On Monday, exactly three years from the day he declared COVID-19 to be a global public health emergency, World Health Organization director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus will decide whether to call it off.

But declaring an end to the "public health emergency of international concern" would not mean COVID-19 is no longer a threat. It will also not do much to change Canada's approach.

"In Canada, we're already doing what we need to do," chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam said in her most recent COVID-19 update.

She said the WHO discussion is important but COVID-19 monitoring and public health responses are not going to end. That includes continued surveillance of cases, particularly severe illness and death, and vaccination campaigns.

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Yesterday at 1:42 PM CST

The World Health Organization's emergency committee, will vote today on whether to maintain the emergency designation. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the WHO, gestures as he speaks to journalists during a press conference at the WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Martial Trezzini-Keystone via AP

No winning ticket sold for Friday’s $26 million Lotto Max jackpot

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Preview

No winning ticket sold for Friday’s $26 million Lotto Max jackpot

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Yesterday at 11:41 PM CST

There was no winning ticket sold in Friday's Lotto Max $26 million draw.

The jackpot for the next draw on Jan. 31 will be an estimated $31 million.

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Yesterday at 11:41 PM CST

There was no winning ticket sold in Friday's Lotto Max $26 million draw.

The jackpot for the next draw on Jan. 31 will be an estimated $31 million.

Lotto Max winning numbers for Friday, Jan. 27, 2023

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Preview

Lotto Max winning numbers for Friday, Jan. 27, 2023

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Yesterday at 11:40 PM CST

TORONTO - The winning numbers in Friday's Lotto Max draw for an estimated $26 million: 04, 05, 09, 13, 29, 30 & 35.

Bonus: 20

In the event of any discrepancy between this list and the official winning numbers, the latter shall prevail.

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Yesterday at 11:40 PM CST

TORONTO - The winning numbers in Friday's Lotto Max draw for an estimated $26 million: 04, 05, 09, 13, 29, 30 & 35.

Bonus: 20

In the event of any discrepancy between this list and the official winning numbers, the latter shall prevail.

Alberta Justice spokespeople deliver duelling statements on prosecutor email review

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Alberta Justice spokespeople deliver duelling statements on prosecutor email review

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Yesterday at 4:26 PM CST

EDMONTON - An email probe into whether Alberta Premier Danielle Smith’s office interfered with Crown prosecutors took a confusing turn Friday after two government spokespeople delivered duelling statements that raised questions over how far back the search went.

The review was ordered by Smith a week ago to respond to allegations in a CBC story that reported a staffer in the premier's office emailed prosecutors last fall to question decisions and direction on cases stemming from a blockade at the Canada-U. S. border crossing at Coutts, Alta.

The Justice Department said Monday it had done a four-month search of ingoing, outgoing and deleted emails and found no evidence of contact.

Two days later, Alberta Justice communications director Charles Mainville said in a statement that deleted emails are wiped from the system after 30 days, meaning the search for deleted emails may not have covered the entire time period in question.

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Yesterday at 4:26 PM CST

A government email review of whether Premier Danielle Smith’s office interfered with Crown prosecutors has taken a confusing turn, with duelling statements from two Alberta Justice spokespeople on what was investigated. Smith gives an update in Calgary, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

B.C. First Nations face complex, stressful choice: should school sites be excavated?

The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

B.C. First Nations face complex, stressful choice: should school sites be excavated?

The Canadian Press 5 minute read Yesterday at 4:21 PM CST

WILLIAMS LAKE, B.C. - The chief of the Williams Lake First Nation says he would support excavating possible unmarked graves at the site of the former St. Joseph's Mission residential school if that's what elders and the community decide is best.

But the decision is complex, involving dozens of other First Nations whose children also attended the institution, numerous landowners, potential DNA tests, multiple levels of government, the coroner and the RCMP.

All that is in addition to the anxiety Chief Willie Sellars said he has about ensuring there isn't more trauma for survivors if bodies are found.

"I really start stressing out when I start thinking about excavation," Sellars said in an interview.

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Yesterday at 4:21 PM CST

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks as Williams Lake First Nation Chief Willie Sellars, left, listens during a visit to the former grounds of St. Joseph's Mission Residential School, in Williams Lake, B.C., on Wednesday, March 30, 2022. The chief says he would support excavating possible unmarked graves found at the site if that's what elders and the community decide is best.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

A Quebec coroner says Montreal’s Champlain Bridge needs anti-suicide barrier

Marisela Amador, The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

A Quebec coroner says Montreal’s Champlain Bridge needs anti-suicide barrier

Marisela Amador, The Canadian Press 2 minute read Yesterday at 2:45 PM CST

Montreal's Samuel-De Champlain Bridge should have a suicide-prevention barrier installed, after a 38-year-old man jumped to his death from the structure last May, a Quebec coroner has recommended.

The existing barrier along the bridge's pedestrian pathway should be made impossible to climb, Dr. Jean E. Brochu said in his report released Jan. 5.

Any able-bodied person could climb the barrier with ease and jump off the structure, the report said. Brochu suggested as a model the anti-suicide fence on the city's Jacques Cartier Bridge, which was installed in 2004 after several people killed themselves jumping off the span.

"When you compare this structure with the one that was installed several years ago on the Jacques Cartier Bridge … it is clear that this one is more difficult, if not impossible to climb," the coroner wrote.

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Yesterday at 2:45 PM CST

A recently released Quebec coroner report says that Montreal's Champlain Bridge needs to improve its safety barrier, after a 38-year-old man jumped to his death from the structure in May 2022. The Samuel de Champlain bridge is seen with the old bridge in the background in Montreal on Monday, June 17, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Canadian police chiefs speak out on death of Black man beaten by U.S. officers

The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

Canadian police chiefs speak out on death of Black man beaten by U.S. officers

The Canadian Press 5 minute read Yesterday at 2:20 PM CST

Canadian police chiefs condemned on Friday the death of a Black man who was savagely beaten by police during a traffic stop in the United States, saying the officers involved must be held accountable.

The condemnation of the actions that led to Tyre Nichols' death came as authorities in Memphis, Tenn., released a video of what happened.

The footage shows officers holding Nichols down and striking him repeatedly as he screamed for his mother.

After the beating, officers milled about for several minutes while Nichols lay propped up against a car, then slumped onto the street.

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Yesterday at 2:20 PM CST

Several police organizations across Canada are sending condolences to the family of a Black man who died earlier this month after five Memphis, Tenn. police officers beat him during a traffic stop. This photo provided by the Nichols family shows Tyre Nichols, who had a passion for photography and was described by friends as joyful and lovable. Nichols was just minutes from his home in Memphis, Tenn., on Jan. 7, 2023, when he was pulled over by police and fatally beaten. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Courtesy of the Nichols family via AP

‘We must meet this moment’: Trudeau says in speech to Liberal caucus

Mickey Djuric, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

‘We must meet this moment’: Trudeau says in speech to Liberal caucus

Mickey Djuric, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 2:13 PM CST

OTTAWA - Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called on his Liberal caucus to meet the moment on Friday, as Canadians deal with the high cost of living, a struggling health-care system and the effects of climate change.

In a 12-minute speech to MPs, Trudeau laid out the minority government's priorities for the coming sitting of the House of Commons, which begins on Monday.

"The world is facing a moment. And as Liberals and as Canadians and as a country, we must meet it," Trudeau said.

Most of his speech was focused on the economy, with Trudeau positioning the growth of green technology as a legacy that will benefit future generations.

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Yesterday at 2:13 PM CST

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to caucus on Parliament Hill, Friday, January 27, 2023 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Elizabeth May says Greens will investigate after member information shared online

David Fraser, The Canadian Press 2 minute read Preview

Elizabeth May says Greens will investigate after member information shared online

David Fraser, The Canadian Press 2 minute read Yesterday at 12:58 PM CST

OTTAWA - Elizabeth May says the Green Party will investigate and conduct a "root to branch review" of all of its data-retention systems after member information was mistakenly posted online.

"We take this very seriously," the Green Party leader said. "We will be ensuring it's not possible to take place again."

Speaking to reporters in Fredericton, May said she does not know how the security breach happened but added the information, including names and addresses of donors, had been available online through Elections Canada before it was mistakenly posted on the party's website.

While the party stressed the information wasn't anything that can't be found on Elections Canada, May said the breach was unintentional and it wasn't meant to be posted on the party's website.

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Yesterday at 12:58 PM CST

Federal Green Party Leader Elizabeth May, deputy leader Jonathan Pedneault (centre) and David Coon, New Brunswick Green Party leader, attend a news conference in Fredericton, Friday, Jan.27, 2023. May says the party will thoroughly investigate and conduct a "root to branch review" of all of their data retention systems after member information was mistakenly posted online. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Hina Alam

Parliament Hill police estimate 500 will attend ‘Freedom Convoy’ anniversary

Dylan Robertson, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

Parliament Hill police estimate 500 will attend ‘Freedom Convoy’ anniversary

Dylan Robertson, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 12:36 PM CST

OTTAWA - The Parliamentary Protective Service expects 500 people to gather this weekend to mark a year since the "Freedom Convoy" occupied downtown Ottawa.

The agency, which polices the precinct, said it will curtail some access to Parliament Hill.

The public can still use the central and east gates to access the Hill lawn, but not the gates closest to the West Block, where the Liberals are holding their caucus meeting this weekend.

The protective service said public tours have been cancelled.

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Yesterday at 12:36 PM CST

Fencing is seen on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, one year after the Freedom Convoy protests took place, on Friday, Jan. 27, 2023. The Parliamentary Protective Service expects 500 people to gather this weekend to mark a year since the "Freedom Convoy" occupied downtown Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Pierre Poilievre tells MPs Canada really ‘feels broken,’ despite what Trudeau says

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Pierre Poilievre tells MPs Canada really ‘feels broken,’ despite what Trudeau says

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Yesterday at 10:29 AM CST

ONTARIO - Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre doubled down on his belief that "everything feels broken" in Canada Friday, as he laced into Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for suggesting otherwise.

At the start of a two-day caucus retreat to plot out their priorities when the House of Commons resumes sitting next week, Poilievre asked Tory MPs: "What's happening in our country?"

His speech offered a blistering review of Trudeau's nearly eight years in power, listing off the ways he believes Canadians are hurting — from high prices at the grocery store to crime that he characterized as out of control — and areas where he believes the government is failing. He cited the recent holiday travel chaos as an example of that.

"Everything feels broken," said Poilievre. "Oh — I just offended Justin Trudeau. He gets very angry when I talk about these problems."

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Yesterday at 10:29 AM CST

Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre holds a press conference in the foyer of the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

129 neglected cattle seized from B.C. property with ‘numerous’ dead animals: SPCA

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Preview

129 neglected cattle seized from B.C. property with ‘numerous’ dead animals: SPCA

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Yesterday at 6:03 PM CST

CAWSTON, B.C. - Animal protection officers with the SPCA have seized 129 cattle from a property in southeastern British Columbia.

The society says the neglected cattle were being housed in substandard conditions on a property in Cawston, B.C., with no access to shelter or protection from the elements.

The society's Eileen Drever says in a statement that the cows did not have adequate food or drinking water and were struggling to move through the mud.

They were also suffering from a range of medical issues, including untreated eye infections, lameness, inflamed udders, overgrown hoofs and diarrhea.

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Yesterday at 6:03 PM CST

Cattle are shown on a property in Cawston, B.C. in this undated handout photo. B.C. SPCA animal protection officers have seized 129 neglected cattle from a property in southern B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, BC SPCA *MANDATORY CREDIT*

B.C. health minister Dix ‘delighted’ premiers finally set to meet PM on funding

The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

B.C. health minister Dix ‘delighted’ premiers finally set to meet PM on funding

The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 5:37 PM CST

VICTORIA - British Columbia's health minister says he's "delighted" Canada's premiers are set to meet with the prime minister early next month to discuss a potential deal to increase federal health funding.

Adrian Dix says the premiers had long been asking to meet Justin Trudeau as they call on Ottawa to boost its contributions through the Canada Health Transfer.

The premiers have demanded the federal government increase its share of health-care spending to 35 per cent from 22 per cent, with no strings attached, while Ottawa has insisted the funds must come with accountability measures.

Asked whether B.C. is open to measures aimed at ensuring funding is used to directly improve care, Dix told reporters B.C. is "meeting the test" as it undertakes "massive" reforms in primary care.

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Yesterday at 5:37 PM CST

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix pauses while responding to questions during a news conference with his provincial counterparts after the first of two days of meetings, in Vancouver on Nov. 7, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Review of oilsands cleanup funding program needs public input, says Alberta NDP

Bob Weber, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

Review of oilsands cleanup funding program needs public input, says Alberta NDP

Bob Weber, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 10:46 AM CST

EDMONTON - Alberta's New Democrat Opposition says a government review of the program that's supposed to ensure oilsands companies can clean up their mines was conducted too privately and should have been done in public.

Environment critic Marlin Schmidt said Albertans now know even less than before the review of the Mine Financial Security Program began.

"Given how much money is at stake and how important this sector is to our economy, the fact the public was completely shut out of this process is really concerning," he said.

Alberta's United Conservative Party government wrapped up consultations this month on how industry financially backstops its cleanup obligations.

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Yesterday at 10:46 AM CST

A heavy hauler truck transports in the oilsands in Fort McMurray Alta, on June 13, 2017. Alberta's New Democrat Opposition says a government review of the program that's supposed to ensure oilsands companies can clean up their mines was too private and should have been done in public. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

U.S. senators call for trade crackdown on Canada over dairy quotas, digital policies

James McCarten, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

U.S. senators call for trade crackdown on Canada over dairy quotas, digital policies

James McCarten, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Yesterday at 10:01 AM CST

WASHINGTON - Two U.S. senators are calling on the Biden administration to get tough with Canada and Mexico over what they describe as the two countries "flouting" their obligations under North America's three-year-old trade agreement.

Democrat Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon and Republican Sen. Mike Crapo, respectively the chairman and ranking member on the Senate finance committee, laid out their concerns in a letter Thursday to U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai.

In it, they describe the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement as an "innovative" tool for raising standards across the continent in areas like fair market access and digital trade.

But America's continental trading partners are still playing fast and loose with the new rules, they write, urging Tai to mark the agreement's anniversary by pressing both Canada and Mexico to get back in line.

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Yesterday at 10:01 AM CST

Dairy cows are seen at a farm, Friday, August 31, 2018 in Sainte-Marie-Madelaine, Que. A pair of senior U.S. senators are urging the Biden administration to get tough with Canada for “flouting” obligations to its North American trade partners. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

In The News for Jan. 27: Concerns over state of provincial health systems

The Canadian Press 9 minute read Preview

In The News for Jan. 27: Concerns over state of provincial health systems

The Canadian Press 9 minute read Yesterday at 3:15 AM CST

In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what's on the radar of our editors for the morning of Jan. 27 ...

What we are watching in Canada ...

A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces.

Leger and The Association for Canadian Studies surveyed approximately 1,500 Canadian adults over a two-day period in January.

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Yesterday at 3:15 AM CST

Paramedics are seen at the Dartmouth General Hospital in Dartmouth, N.S. on July 4, 2013. A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

In The News for Jan. 27: Concerns over state of provincial health systems

The Canadian Press 9 minute read Preview

In The News for Jan. 27: Concerns over state of provincial health systems

The Canadian Press 9 minute read Yesterday at 3:15 AM CST

In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what's on the radar of our editors for the morning of Jan. 27 ...

What we are watching in Canada ...

A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces.

Leger and The Association for Canadian Studies surveyed approximately 1,500 Canadian adults over a two-day period in January.

Read
Yesterday at 3:15 AM CST

Paramedics are seen at the Dartmouth General Hospital in Dartmouth, N.S. on July 4, 2013. A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Focus on retaining nurses before recruiting nurses from other provinces: association

Jacob Serebrin, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Focus on retaining nurses before recruiting nurses from other provinces: association

Jacob Serebrin, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Yesterday at 3:01 AM CST

MONTREAL - Efforts to lure nurses from other provinces are underway in several parts of the country, but the head of a national nurses association says the poaching won't solve anything unless working conditions are improved.

"We know that nurses are facing inadequate working conditions, and that is the main reason many are leaving their jobs," Sylvain Brousseau, the president of the Canadian Nurses Association, said in an interview Thursday. "If working conditions and retention are not the focus, the new nurses recruited from other provinces may find themselves wanting to leave their jobs."

This week, Horizon Health Network, one of New Brunswick's two health authorities, held three-day recruiting events in Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal. Its pitch to attract 120 nurses to the province includes the promise of an appealing life near the ocean with financial incentives of up to $20,000.

A spokesperson said recruiting from outside of New Brunswick isn't new, and that it's also hiring nurses through partnerships with universities in Maine and in India, as well as taking steps to retain workers. The province's other regional health authority, Vitalité Health Network, says it will be attending several career fairs in Quebec in the coming weeks.

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Yesterday at 3:01 AM CST

Efforts by provinces and health authorities to recruit nurses from other parts of the country won't solve nursing shortages unless they address the reasons people are leaving the profession, a nurses association said. A nurse greets a woman at a walk-in clinic in Montreal, on Tuesday, September 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Provincial governments not jumping to act on tighter alcohol warning guidelines

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press 6 minute read Preview

Provincial governments not jumping to act on tighter alcohol warning guidelines

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press 6 minute read Yesterday at 3:01 AM CST

HALIFAX - Politicians in charge of provincial and territorial liquor laws aren't hurrying to adopt or promote newly updated guidelines that advise a steep drop in Canadian drinking habits.

Across Canada, the responsible ministers declined interview requests from The Canadian Press. In written responses, they didn't commit to changing marketing methods for alcohol and noted they're awaiting Ottawa's lead on whether to slap warning labels on products.

In some cases, such as Nunavut and British Columbia, governments say they're actively reviewing the guidelines. Two provinces — New Brunswick and Nova Scotia — as well as the Northwest Territories said their health departments are developing plans to incorporate the new advice. The Northwest Territories Health Department said it intends to “share the new guidelines broadly.”

The guidance prepared by the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction for Health Canada and released on Jan. 17 represents a major shift from its 2011 advice that having two drinks a day was considered low risk. The updated report says there is a moderate risk of harm for those who consume between three and six standard drinks a week, and it increases for every additional drink.

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Yesterday at 3:01 AM CST

A person's purchases are seen in a shopping cart at a government-run BC Liquor Store in Vancouver, on Friday, August 19, 2022. Politicians in charge of provincial liquor corporations aren't hurrying to adopt or promote updated guidelines that advise a steep drop in Canadian drinking habits. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Mandatory minimum penalty for firing gun at house unconstitutional: Supreme Court

Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Preview

Mandatory minimum penalty for firing gun at house unconstitutional: Supreme Court

Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press 4 minute read Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that a mandatory minimum sentence of four years for firing a gun at a house is unconstitutional on the basis it could amount to cruel and unusual punishment.

In a companion judgment Friday, the top court said two other minimum sentences, both involving armed robbery offences, do not represent excessive punishment and are therefore constitutional.

The Supreme Court also affirmed and developed the framework for weighing challenges to the constitutionality of a mandatory minimum sentence under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms provision against cruel and unusual treatment or punishment.

The first decision came in the case of Jesse Dallas Hills, who pleaded guilty to four charges stemming from a May 2014 incident in Lethbridge, Alta., in which he swung a baseball bat and shot at a car with a rifle, smashed the window of a vehicle and fired rounds into a family home.

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Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

The flag of the Supreme Court of Canada flies on the east flag pole on Monday, Nov. 28, 2022. The Supreme Court of Canada plans to rule today on the constitutionality of mandatory minimum sentences in cases involving armed robbery and recklessly firing a gun. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canadians worried about the state of provincial health systems: poll

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

Canadians worried about the state of provincial health systems: poll

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

OTTAWA - A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces where hospitals have struggled to maintain emergency services for months.

Leger and The Association for Canadian Studies surveyed 1,554 Canadian adults over a two-day period in January.

Doctors, nurses and patient advocacy groups have been frantically waving red flags about the crisis unfolding in Canadian hospitals since the pandemic began, when intensive care units and emergency rooms were flooded with patients.

Since then, the already burnt-out workforce has steadily declined, leaving fewer health workers to cope with waves of flu and other respiratory illnesses at the end of last year.

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Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system in their province, particularly in Atlantic provinces. Paramedics are seen at the Dartmouth General Hospital in Dartmouth, N.S. on July 4, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Canadians worried about the state of provincial health systems: poll

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Preview

Canadians worried about the state of provincial health systems: poll

Laura Osman, The Canadian Press 3 minute read Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

OTTAWA - A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system, particularly in Atlantic provinces where hospitals have struggled to maintain emergency services for months.

Leger and The Association for Canadian Studies surveyed 1,554 Canadian adults over a two-day period in January.

Doctors, nurses and patient advocacy groups have been frantically waving red flags about the crisis unfolding in Canadian hospitals since the pandemic began, when intensive care units and emergency rooms were flooded with patients.

Since then, the already burnt-out workforce has steadily declined, leaving fewer health workers to cope with waves of flu and other respiratory illnesses at the end of last year.

Read
Yesterday at 3:00 AM CST

A new survey suggests the vast majority of Canadians have concerns about the state of the health-care system in their province, particularly in Atlantic provinces. Paramedics are seen at the Dartmouth General Hospital in Dartmouth, N.S. on July 4, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

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