Manitoba MD honoured for work in Africa

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A Manitoba-born and -trained doctor who has spent the past 30 years studying infectious diseases in Africa will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 15/10/2010 (4375 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

A Manitoba-born and -trained doctor who has spent the past 30 years studying infectious diseases in Africa will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

Dr. Allan Ronald, a renowned infectious-disease researcher who is considered one of Canada’s foremost physicians and microbiologists, will be inducted under the “builder (innovative leadership)” category.

Ronald officially retired in 2000 after a 32-year career as a professor and researcher with the University of Manitoba, but has since kept busy fostering the comprehensive HIV/AIDS Care and Prevention Program in Uganda. His expertise is still sought-after by governments and international agencies.

CNS Saskatoon Star Phoenix Dr. Allan Ronald: hall of fame

In 1980, Ronald established one of the first clinical investigation units exploring sexually transmitted infections in Africa. The program started small but eventually would put the University of Manitoba on the map as a leader in the field of HIV epidemiology and immunology, as well as improve disease prevention and care. Lessons learned have been used widely throughout Kenya and around the world.

The Manitoba/University of Nairobi group has made major discoveries, including recognizing the importance of breast milk in the transmission of HIV from mothers to infants, the role of male circumcision in reducing the risk of HIV infection among men, and the role of the immune system in protecting some individuals from acquiring HIV infection.

— Staff

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