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Chalet Hotel sold again after convicted pimp fails to complete July purchase

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 22/10/2019 (221 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

The Chalet Hotel — home to a Winnipeg strip club with a checkered, violent past — is changing owners for the second time in less than three months.

During a mortgage sale at Kaye’s Auctions in downtown Winnipeg Tuesday morning, a group of three men — who would not provide their names when approached by the Free Press — placed a winning bid of roughly $980,000 for the property.

The hotel is home to Teasers Burlesque Palace and is located at 611 Archibald St. in St. Boniface.

Chalet Hotel's new owner a real estate lawyer by day, violent pimp 'parasite' by night

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Robin Skolnik with Patterson.
Robin Skolnik with Patterson.

Posted: 24/07/2019 7:00 PM

The man who placed the winning — and only — bid at Tuesday's mortgage auction of the Chalet Hotel — home to Teasers strip club — is a disbarred lawyer who led a secret double life as a pimp until his conviction for kidnapping and prostitution two decades ago.

The Free Press has learned that Gary Wayne Gabriel Patterson is the man who bid $1.3 million for the Chalet Hotel at Kaye's Auctions in downtown Winnipeg Tuesday morning. The hotel, at 611 Archibald St., has seen its share of violence in its century of existence. Two police officers died following a raid of the hotel in 1920.

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Disbarred lawyer and convicted pimp Gary Wayne Gabriel Patterson successfully bid $1.3 million to purchase the property at a mortgage sale in July, but then failed to come up with the rest of the money needed to close the deal.

By failing to pay the remaining balance on the property, Patterson will have lost his initial deposit of 20 per cent, or roughly $260,000.

The new ownership group was required to put down a deposit of nearly $200,000 Tuesday. They now have a set period of time to pay the remaining balance on the property or they, too, will forfeit the deposit.

The hotel, which features 19 rooms, the strip club, a downstairs lounge, a restaurant and a beer vendor, has seen its share of violence since opening as the Stock Yard Hotel in 1913.

During the late 1910s and early 1920s, it was the site of frequent provincial police raids after it gained a reputation for breaching temperance and gambling laws.

On Nov. 11, 1920, the hotel was the site of the deadliest day in Manitoba police history when a routine temperance check led to the murder of two officers.

After the July 23 mortgage sale, the Free Press reported Patterson's disturbing criminal history.

Following a two-week trial in May 2000, Patterson, then 36, was found guilty of 10 criminal charges stemming from a series of incidents in Toronto and sentenced to seven years in prison.

The hotel features 19 rooms, the strip club, a downstairs lounge, a restaurant and a beer vendor. (John Woods / Free Press files)

The hotel features 19 rooms, the strip club, a downstairs lounge, a restaurant and a beer vendor. (John Woods / Free Press files)

While leading a secret double life as lawyer by day and violent pimp at night, he kidnapped a teenager, forced her into street prostitution and threatened her with mutilation if she disobeyed his orders. The case received widespread media coverage in Toronto at the time.

Patterson had been a commercial and real estate lawyer until his disbarment. He was called to the Ontario bar in 1995 and was also licensed to practise law in the New York state.

The same year he became an Ontario lawyer, Patterson was a fugitive from justice in the U.S.

In 1995, the State of Nevada issued a warrant for his arrest after he fled the area before he was scheduled to stand trial on pimping-related charges. The U.S. authorities have never initiated extradition proceedings.

During a mortgage sale at Kaye’s Auctions in downtown Winnipeg Tuesday morning, a group of three men placed a winning bid of roughly $980,000 for the property. (John Woods / Free Press files)

During a mortgage sale at Kaye’s Auctions in downtown Winnipeg Tuesday morning, a group of three men placed a winning bid of roughly $980,000 for the property. (John Woods / Free Press files)

In addition, during his trial in Toronto, Crown attorney Mary Humphrey tried — and failed — to introduce as evidence the accounts of two other women who claimed to have been enslaved and beaten by Patterson, according to reports published in the Globe and Mail.

While it's not clear who the new Chalet owners are, the details will become public record once the mortgage sale is finalized.

ryan.thorpe@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @rk_thorpe

Ryan Thorpe

Ryan Thorpe
Reporter

Ryan Thorpe likes the pace of daily news, the feeling of a broadsheet in his hands and the stress of never-ending deadlines hanging over his head.

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