December 9, 2019

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New CMHR exhibit allows the visually impaired to experience photography with touch, sound

JUSTIN SAMANSKI-LANGILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Pete Haertel, who is visually impaired, interacts with one of the tactile 3D photo displays inside the new photo exhibition inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.</p>

JUSTIN SAMANSKI-LANGILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Pete Haertel, who is visually impaired, interacts with one of the tactile 3D photo displays inside the new photo exhibition inside the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

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Kookum, 2015<br>Steve Courchene, Winnipeg<br>Survivors of Indian residential schools gather in Ottawa for the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. Among them was this kookum (a grandmother), who embodied pride, resilience, beauty, and her own sense of individuality.<br>Rights, camera... moved to action
Kookum, 2015
Steve Courchene, Winnipeg
Survivors of Indian residential schools gather in Ottawa for the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report. Among them was this kookum (a grandmother), who embodied pride, resilience, beauty, and her own sense of individuality.
A Welcome Sign, 2016<br>Steve Courchene, Winnipeg<br>There were few healthy relationships between Sagkeeng First Nation and nearby communities. But one family business extended its hand. This sign welcomes First Nations to access the spring well on its property and take rocks for indigenous ceremonies.<br>
A Welcome Sign, 2016
Steve Courchene, Winnipeg
There were few healthy relationships between Sagkeeng First Nation and nearby communities. But one family business extended its hand. This sign welcomes First Nations to access the spring well on its property and take rocks for indigenous ceremonies.
Pride Parade, 2015<br>Reed Oslund, Winnipeg<br>This man was part of an entourage that recreated extravagant outfits worn by drag duo Pictoria Secrete and Gloria Booths, who led the Winnipeg Pride parade from 2005-2014. I loved that the friends who were honouring this duo represented a variety of sexualities.<br><br><br><br><br>
Pride Parade, 2015
Reed Oslund, Winnipeg
This man was part of an entourage that recreated extravagant outfits worn by drag duo Pictoria Secrete and Gloria Booths, who led the Winnipeg Pride parade from 2005-2014. I loved that the friends who were honouring this duo represented a variety of sexualities.




Lee, 2016<br>Reed Oslund, Winnipeg<br>Lee is a local Winnipeg musician who supports himself by working as a chef. Lee is also a gay man. When he was younger, he was a competitive boxer. This skill came in handy when he was jumped by four homophobes for his sexual orientation and was able to fight back. <br><br><br>
Lee, 2016
Reed Oslund, Winnipeg
Lee is a local Winnipeg musician who supports himself by working as a chef. Lee is also a gay man. When he was younger, he was a competitive boxer. This skill came in handy when he was jumped by four homophobes for his sexual orientation and was able to fight back.


Ode to The REDress Project, 2015<br>Nancy McMillan, Winnipeg<br>Artist Jaime Black’s installation, The REDress Project, focuses on the more than 1,000 missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada. Red dresses were installed in public spaces to highlight this national issue, like this one outside a Winnipeg school.<br>
Ode to The REDress Project, 2015
Nancy McMillan, Winnipeg
Artist Jaime Black’s installation, The REDress Project, focuses on the more than 1,000 missing and murdered indigenous women in Canada. Red dresses were installed in public spaces to highlight this national issue, like this one outside a Winnipeg school.
History

Updated on Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 4:07 PM CDT: Writethrough

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