December 12, 2018

Winnipeg
-4° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Premier accused of playing 'race card'

Pallister should apologize to Métis, Kinew says

NDP Leader Wab Kinew</p>

NDP Leader Wab Kinew

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 21/3/2018 (265 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Premier Brian Pallister must apologize to Manitoba’s Métis for trying to use them as a distraction to divert attention away from his own lack of leadership, NDP Leader Wab Kinew demanded Wednesday.

He said the mass resignation of the Manitoba Hydro board came about because Pallister is a one-man team who refused to listen to his own hand-picked board, which is running Manitoba’s most important asset.

He said Pallister is trying to deflect attention away from his leadership failures by blaming the federation over what the premier is packaging as a $70-million payment to persuade the federation not to block a transmission line to Minnesota.

“First of all, the premier should apologize to the Métis people of the province,” Kinew said. “Time and again, he has tried to divide Manitobans.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 30 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 30 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 30 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 21/3/2018 (265 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Premier Brian Pallister must apologize to Manitoba’s Métis for trying to use them as a distraction to divert attention away from his own lack of leadership, NDP Leader Wab Kinew demanded Wednesday.

He said the mass resignation of the Manitoba Hydro board came about because Pallister is a one-man team who refused to listen to his own hand-picked board, which is running Manitoba’s most important asset.

He said Pallister is trying to deflect attention away from his leadership failures by blaming the federation over what the premier is packaging as a $70-million payment to persuade the federation not to block a transmission line to Minnesota.

"First of all, the premier should apologize to the Métis people of the province," Kinew said. "Time and again, he has tried to divide Manitobans.

"This is a disaster of the premier’s own making."

Hydro board members, who are staunch Tory party members and supporters, quit because Pallister wouldn’t meet with them or listen to them, Kinew said.

Manitoba Metis Federation president David Chartrand accused Pallister of playing ‘the race card’ to divide Manitobans against Indigenous peoples to divert attention from his own failings.

Chartrand said the proposed payment is part of a 2014 Turning the Page agreement coming out of the Truth and Reconciliation process. It’s not a $70-million lump sum, but rather $67 million paid out over 50 years, the Métis president said.

"He doesn’t see us as a rights-bearing people," Chartrand said in an interview. "We’re being used as a scapegoat because he didn’t do his job.

"He wouldn’t meet with Sandy (Riley) for a year — that’s what the issue is," Chartrand said.

"His comments are right on," Kinew said. "The premier shouldn’t be trying to blame the Métis to get away from his own bad day on Hydro."

Kinew said the payment to the Métis shouldn’t be allowed to distract attention from Hydro’s problems and Pallister’s failures.

"The honour of the Crown is at stake," Kinew said. "He’s opening up the province of Manitoba to a legal challenge. The agreement should be honoured," Kinew said.

For the first time since the Tories were elected in 2016, question period was dominated by just one issue. Pallister was far more forthcoming with reporters in a scrum than he was in the house during question period.

"Hydro is a life-and-death issue. Today, there was a blackout of leadership," Kinew told the house. "Why would the premier not listen to his own hand-picked board?

"It would appear this premier is a team of one," the opposition leader said. "Why can’t he find one hour, one half-hour, 10 minutes, to sit down with the board? We’re seeing a desperate premier trying to change the channel."

Pallister acknowledged that, "This is an unhappy day for me on a personal level."

But he avoided talking about the substance of the Hydro board’s reasons for resigning or about Chartrand’s accusations throughout the 40-minute question period.

Instead, Pallister reminded Kinew that the former NDP government had five cabinet ministers quit. He urged Kinew to "get away from trying to reconcile his personal life."

Pallister said that the former NDP government couldn’t even protect its own staff from sexual harassment. "He’s throwing stones from a glass house."

Liberal Leader Dougald Lamont called the day’s events shocking: "This is a vote of non-confidence in the premier," Lamont said. "This is absolutely political interference in Hydro, again, which is the last thing we need."

Lamont predicted Pallister will appoint a compliant board that does his bidding. Kinew called for the public utilities board or some other independent body to take over cabinet’s job of appointing the Hydro board.

nick.martin@freepress.mb.ca

 

 

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us