September 20, 2018

Winnipeg
3° C, Partly cloudy

Full Forecast

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Winnipeggers dig out after biggest snowstorm of the winter

City aims to plow residential streets following snowy wallop

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/3/2018 (199 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Snow slowed everything to a crawl throughout southern Manitoba Monday.

A storm overnight and into the day Monday dropped 20 centimetres of snow on Winnipeg, and another two to four centimetres could yet fall before it's all over.

Than means Winnipeg has had more snowfall in the past 24 hours than all of January and February combined. Those two months saw 17 cm in total.

“It’s the biggest snowstorm of the winter,” retired Environment Canada meteorologist Rob Paola said.

Get the full story.
No credit card required. Cancel anytime.

Join free for 60 days

After that, pay as little as $0.99 per month for the best local news coverage in Manitoba.

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Join free for 60 days

 

Already a subscriber?

Log in

Subscribers Log in below to continue reading,
not a subscriber? Create an account to start a 60 day free trial.

Log in Create your account

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

Your free trial has come to an end.

We hope you have enjoyed your trial! To continue reading, we recommend our Read Now Pay Later membership. Simply add a form of payment and pay only 27¢ per article.

For unlimited access to the best local, national, and international news and much more, try an All Access Digital subscription:

Thank you for supporting the journalism that our community needs!

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Mon to Sat Delivery

Pay

$34.36

per month

  • Includes all benefits of All Access Digital
  • 6-day delivery of our award-winning newspaper
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

We hope you have enjoyed your free trial!

To continue reading, select a plan below:

Read Now Pay Later

Pay

27¢

per article

  • Commitment-free
  • Cancel anytime
  • Only pay for what you read
  • Refunds available
Continue

All Access Digital

Introductory pricing*

99¢

per month

  • Unlimited online reading and commenting
  • Daily newspaper replica e-Edition
  • News Break - our award-winning iOS app
  • Exclusive perks & discounts
Continue

*Introductory pricing schedule for 12 month: $0.99/month plus tax for first 3 months, $5.99/month for months 4 - 6, $10.99/month for months 7 - 9, $13.99/month for months 10 - 12. Standard All Access Digital rate of $16.99/month begins after first year.

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 5/3/2018 (199 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Snow slowed everything to a crawl throughout southern Manitoba Monday.

A storm overnight and into the day Monday dropped 20 centimetres of snow on Winnipeg, and another two to four centimetres could yet fall before it's all over.

Than means Winnipeg has had more snowfall in the past 24 hours than all of January and February combined. Those two months saw 17 cm in total.

"It’s the biggest snowstorm of the winter," retired Environment Canada meteorologist Rob Paola said.

With blanket weather warnings through the weekend, and the impact of road and school closures, this storm may seem like a big deal. But it pales in comparison to the record-setting storm of March 4, 1966, where the city was hit with 38 cm of snow and hammered by 112 km-h winds.

However, Paola said Winnipeg doesn't have to look back very far to see snowstorms that are comparable to the latest one. There were two big storms in December 2016, both of which dumped 25 centimetres of snow on the city.

"It’s a big deal by this winter’s standards because it’s been such a quiet winter," said Paolo, who has 30-plus years experience forecasting weather on the Prairies and in Ontario.

City to plow residential streets, lanes

Cheryl Anderson, the city's acting manager of streets maintenance, said beginning Monday evening hundreds of graders, trucks, spreaders and sidewalk plows will work 24 hours a day clearing main streets, bus routes and collector streets. Clearing of back alleys will begin Tuesday morning, with residential streets beginning Wednesday evening.

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p><p>Aaron Challis walks his dog, Beasley, in the middle of the road to avoid deep snow in Winnipeg on Monday.</p>

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Aaron Challis walks his dog, Beasley, in the middle of the road to avoid deep snow in Winnipeg on Monday.

"We're anticipating to clear the snow as quickly as we can," she said. "We're hoping by the end of the week."

Anderson said it is unusual for the city's first residential snow plow of the winter to be in March. She said it's too soon to estimate what the final cost will be.

"It's too early to tally the numbers, but I know they will be in the millions," she said.

City snow-clearing crews hit the streets shortly after midnight. Some 200 separate pieces of equipment have been working an effort to clear roads, which allowed major traffic routes to stay open, though most arteries were moving at slower than normal speed limits.

Plows were put on a rotating schedule to shift back and forth clearing major routes and collector lanes by turn through the day.

And as if it needed mentioning, the city declared the snow route parking ban would remain in place until Wednesday at 7 a.m.

Motorists need to be patient when they see a line of snow plows on the road ahead working together to clear a street, public works spokesman Ken Allen advised Sunday.

"Sometimes motorists cut in between the plows, which is a very hazardous type of practice," Allen said. "Our operators are focused on plowing the snow and if someone ducks in behind them, it's hard to see. We want to remind people to stay back and stay safe from snowclearing equipment."

Kim Barrow, with yellow push shovel, is happy that her neighbour on Cormorant Bay, Bob Yamashita, has a gas powered snowblower. (Boris Minkevich / Winnipeg Free Press)

Kim Barrow, with yellow push shovel, is happy that her neighbour on Cormorant Bay, Bob Yamashita, has a gas powered snowblower. (Boris Minkevich / Winnipeg Free Press)

Earlier in the day, the city warned even emergency crews — fire trucks, ambulances and police — were reporting delays.

"Adverse weather conditions affect travel times for all vehicles on the road, including emergency vehicles. (Winnipeg Fire Paramedic Service) is currently experiencing longer response times," the city said in an update as the morning rush hour wound down.

Four additional ambulances were pressed into service to accommodate poor road and weather conditions, the city said in the update. City officials pledged to monitor emergency response times and put additional resource in place as needed.

Home care services delayed, cancelled

Also delayed or cancelled were home-care services and other community health care. Patients who required urgent care were being prioritized, Monday, the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority said in a statement.

"If you are a non-urgent home-care client, or have a family member who is, be aware of the potential for service interruption and initiate your backup plan through family or friends," the health authority said.

For health-care updates, the WRHA was using social media and local radio. To find them, follow winnipegregionalhealthauthority on Facebook, and @WinnipegRHA on Twitter.

At Winnipeg's international airport, multiple departures and arrivals were displaying as delayed Monday afternoon into the evening.

Winnipeg Transit was experiencing delays and riders were asked to allow for extra travel time.

Many highways throughout the province were closed early Monday, including parts of the Trans-Canada and Highway 75 south to the U.S. border. Both those major highways had reopened by midafternoon.  See the Manitoba Highways website for current highway conditions.

Many rural school divisions closed their schools. School divisions in Winnipeg had cancelled their bus service, but most schools were open and classes were expected to go ahead.

Heavy snow sticking to wires caused outages across southern Manitoba. About 10,000 customers were without power at 8:30 Monday morning. Manitoba Hydro reported poor road conditions and continued snow made it hard to respond to power outages.

— with files from Carol Sanders

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Remembering the March 1966 storm that paralyzed Winnipeg
A car sits trapped right In the middle of Portage Avenue. (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Drivers shovel furiously in an unequal battle with drifting snow. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Traffic on Portage Avenue at Polo Park at 8:30 a.m. was barely visible. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Determined citizens struggled against blinding blizzard conditions at a downtown intersection. (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A car on Wolseley is covered in the 1966 blizzard. (Gerry Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press files)
Winnipeggers took the weather in stride... although the buses may have had to search for them. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
(Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A group of Winnipeggers who spent 13 hours in bogged buses. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A driver and passenger who spent all day and night aboard a transit bus. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
The weekend snowstorm may have brought hardship to some Winnipeg adults but for the younger set it meant fun and excitement. Here, a group of St. James youths use piled up mounds of snow as landing fields as they leap off the roof of Silver Heights United church. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A plow clears out Hind Avenue in St. James. (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Gerry Cairns/ Winnipeg Free Press Archives Winnipeg Blizzard (2) March 5, 1966 Skier on Snow Banks- Furby Street, after snow storm fparchive
Winnipeg Free Press Archives Winnipeg Blizzard (6) March 7, 1966 Weight too much for Portage Avenue marquee fparchive
Jack Ablett/Winnipeg Free Press Archives Winnipeg Blizzard (9) March 5, 1966 Passersby are half hidden by a waist-high snowdrift. fparchive
The Bay is uncharacteristically empty as the blizzard of March 4, 1966 hits. Some shoppers were trapped in the store by the storm. (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Portage Avenue and Donald Street, midnight (Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Surveying the results of the blizzard was part of the game for pedestrians along Portage Avenue who gaped in wonderment at snow hurled high along the sidewalks.
(Jack Ablett / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Winnipeggers, sightseers in their own city, marvelled at the enormous piles of snow... then get down to the serious business of digging themselves out. (Gerry Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Sign collapses under weight of snow. storm (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Main Street (Gerry Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Cars buried by snow. (Gerry Cairns / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A Crescent Creamery truck stuck in snow on Memorial Boulevard (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
A man appears perplexed about what do do with a car plowed under on Osborne Street. (Bill Rose / Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
Snow piled high along the Red River. The picture was taken near the Louis Bridge, Higgins Avenue and Stadacona Street. (Winnipeg Free Press Archives)
History

Updated on Monday, March 5, 2018 at 8:29 AM CST: Updates with current conditions

8:42 AM: Changes photo

10:06 AM: Adds links, photos; updates information

3:22 PM: Updates with historic information

7:17 PM: fixes spelling of name

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

New to commenting? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions.

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

The Winnipeg Free Press does not necessarily endorse any of the views posted. By submitting your comment, you agree to our Terms and Conditions. These terms were revised effective January 2015.