July 13, 2020

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'Time for a change': Tory victor in Seine River

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 19/4/2016 (1545 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Yet another NDP stronghold – which was up for grabs – fell to the Progressive Conservatives in Seine River Tuesday night.

Janice Morley-Lecomte, a 49-year-old domestic-violence counsellor at a Winnipeg women’s shelter, was swept into office with over a 50 percent majority of the vote in the constituency, which had been NDP since 2003.

Janice Morley-Lecomte (SUBMITTED)

Janice Morley-Lecomte (SUBMITTED)

"Time for a change," Morley-Lecomte said, just before entering the PC election party headquarters at Canad Inns Polo Park on Tuesday night.

Seine River was left vacant by incumbent Theresa Oswald, the former NDP cabinet minister who resigned after playing a starring role in the Rebel Five who tried unsuccessfully to oust leader Greg Selinger last year.

Oswald captured the seat in the 2011 election by 931 votes, and held the riding since 2003.

Most political observers believed Oswald’s departure left the riding – considered a bellwether constituency - up for grabs.

"It’s overwhelming," Morley-Lecomte added. "It’s a result of a lot of hard work. They (the voters) put their trust in me and I’m going to make them happy they did."

Liberal candidate Peter Chura, a political neophyte and former news anchor with Global TV finished a distant second.

Chura, 46, said the Liberals missed an opportunity, unable to attract voters disaffected by both the Conservatives and Selinger’s faltering NDP.

"The party had a problem presenting itself as a serious alternative," he said, noting the disqualification of a half dozen candidates in mid-election. "A rising tide lifts all ships. When the opposite happens it has the opposite effect."

Lise Pinkos, 32, an assistant manager at the Canadian Museum of Human Rights, finished in third place on the ballot.

Randy Turner

Randy Turner
Reporter

Randy Turner spent much of his journalistic career on the road. A lot of roads. Dirt roads, snow-packed roads, U.S. interstates and foreign highways. In other words, he got a lot of kilometres on the odometer, if you know what we mean.

Read full biography

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