July 3, 2020

Winnipeg
20° C, Overcast

Full Forecast

WEATHER ALERT

Help us deliver reliable news during this pandemic.

We are working tirelessly to bring you trusted information about COVID-19. Support our efforts by subscribing today.

No Thanks Subscribe

Already a subscriber?

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Beaulieu, Ehlers cringe after watching Ottawa rookie's frightening collision

Ottawa Senators and Boston Bruins players watch as medical workers attend to Scott Sabourin, who was injured on a play with David Backes during the first period Saturday ion Boston. (Charles Krupa /  Asspociated Press files)

Ottawa Senators and Boston Bruins players watch as medical workers attend to Scott Sabourin, who was injured on a play with David Backes during the first period Saturday ion Boston. (Charles Krupa / Asspociated Press files)

Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 4/11/2019 (241 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

Nathan Beaulieu watched video of the Scott Sabourin injury in Boston over the weekend and now wishes he hadn't.

The Winnipeg Jets defenceman was distressed by the frightening scene at Boston's TD Garden on Saturday night that left the Ottawa Senators forward motionless on the ice and Bruins forward David Backes visibly upset after a head-to-head collision between the two players.

Sabourin fell to the ice and appeared to be unconscious, and was later taken off the ice by stretcher as players from both sides left their benches to stand side by side as he was wheeled to a waiting ambulance. He was conscious and gave a thumbs-up on his way off before spending the night in hospital for observation, and has a broken nose and a suspected concussion.

Backes, too, could miss time with a concussion. The two came together at full speed early in the first period of Boston's 5-2 win on Saturday night.

"I watched it once and I couldn't watch it again. You obviously really feel for the kid," Beaulieu said, following practice Monday at Bell MTS Place. After suffering an upper body injury in the club's final pre-season contest, Beaulieu might finally make his regular-season debut Tuesday when the New Jersey Devils visit Winnipeg.

"It's sad to see. You don't wish that on anyone. We're all in this dogfight together. We don't hate anyone... just glad to see (Sabourin) is OK," Beaulieu said.

A crowd pushing nearly 18,000 was in the Garden but there wasn't a peep as training staff from both teams rushed out to help Sabourin, the 27-year Sens rookie. Beaulieu said he's experienced that kind of hush falling over a horrified building at least twice before.

"I watched it once and I couldn't watch it again. You obviously really feel for the kid," Nathan Beaulieu said. (Daniel Crump / Free Press files)</p>

"I watched it once and I couldn't watch it again. You obviously really feel for the kid," Nathan Beaulieu said. (Daniel Crump / Free Press files)

"I've seen a couple of bad ones, actually. Lars Eller got hit in the playoffs, I don't remember who hit him but he was unconscious on the ice," said Beaulieu, who was on the Montreal blue line in early May 2013 when his Habs teammate was flattened after taking a big hit from Ottawa defenceman Eric Gryba.

The following season, Beaulieu watched as another teammate, George Parros, lay unconscious after a fight with Toronto forward Colton Orr. Parros lost his balance while swinging at Orr and tumbled face first.

"It's obviously extremely scary, and when you're at the Bell Centre and you can hear a pin drop you know something's wrong," he recalled.

Jets forward Nikolaj Ehlers said he hasn't yet experienced the sickening feeling of watching a fellow player struggle like that in the stunned silence of an arena.

"I don't remember being in that situation. I hope I never will be. You could feel how quiet that rink got and how everyone was in shock. Luckily, it doesn't happen too much," said Ehlers, who watched the Boston highlights with his teammates in Vegas.

"We're opponents, we're not friends on the ice, but in a sense we're still brothers all around."


 

Jack Roslovic, who has a pair of goals and four assists this year, said he's received poor reviews from his boss in the past, adding the constructive criticism only fuels him to improve. (Mike Deal / Free Press files)</p></p>

Jack Roslovic, who has a pair of goals and four assists this year, said he's received poor reviews from his boss in the past, adding the constructive criticism only fuels him to improve. (Mike Deal / Free Press files)

Jack Roslovic was called out publicly by his coach the other night but hasn't lost any sleep over it.

The Jets winger made a nifty play to set up Nikolaj Ehlers' game-winner in San Jose with just 1:24 left in the third period, propelling the Jets to a 3-2 victory despite having being outshot 53-19. While Maurice offered post-game kudos for that particular play, he also took a shot at Roslovic's overall performance against the Sharks.

"Jack Roslovic created that goal, and he needed to, because he was so bad through two-and-a-half (periods). But you know what? Good for him. That’s important. Because you play 82 games and you’re going to have a night where you just can’t get it done and it’s not going for you. But he didn’t sulk, he didn’t sit on the bench. He went out, he and Nik Ehlers win us the game, along with our goaltender, after a real, real tough night," Maurice said.

Roslovic, who has a pair of goals and four assists this year, said he's received poor reviews from his boss in the past, adding the constructive criticism only fuels him to improve.

"Maybe he’s giving you guys a look of what happens inside the locker room. It’s not a pat-on-the-back business, and constructive criticism coaches use and even players use. I’m fine with," he said. "I had a good stretch of games, and I said in Vegas you don’t ever play as bad as you think you did or as good as you think you did.

"I looked back at it and it wasn’t my strongest (game) and the criticism I take to heart to get better."


C.J. Suess suited up for the Jets in California but is back in the American Hockey League after being assigned Monday to the Manitoba Moose.

Suess played six minutes and 26 seconds in his NHL debut in San Jose on Friday night as the Jets defeated the Sharks 3-2. He was credited with one hit and finished a minus-1.

The 25-year-old from St. Paul, Minn., filled in while Adam Lowry served the second game of his suspension and Patrik Laine sat out with a minor injury.


Some crucial assistance from Jansen Harkins was impossible to ignore this week.

The Manitoba Moose forward was named the American Hockey League's player of the week after he helped guide his squad to a pair of weekend victories over the Grand Rapids Griffins.

He assisted on all five goals Saturday in Manitoba's 5-3 win over visiting Grand Rapids, tying a franchise record for most helpers in a game. On Sunday, he followed up with a goal and two assists as the Moose earned a 7-4 win over the Griffins.

The Moose head out this week on a three-game road swing — with stops in Milwaukee, Rockford and Chicago — before returning home to face the Texas Stars on Monday, Remembrance Day. The game is being dubbed Military Appreciation Night.

The Jets will host their Canadian Armed Forces Night a day later (Nov. 12) when the Colorado Avalanche are in town.

 

jason.bell@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @WFPJasonBell

Jason Bell

Jason Bell
Assistant sports editor

Jason Bell wanted to be a lawyer when he was a kid. The movie The Paper Chase got him hooked on the idea of law school and, possibly, falling in love with someone exactly like Lindsay Wagner (before she went all bionic).

Read full biography

Advertisement

Advertise With Us

Your support has enabled us to provide free access to stories about COVID-19 because we believe everyone deserves trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

Our readership has contributed additional funding to give Free Press online subscriptions to those that can’t afford one in these extraordinary times — giving new readers the opportunity to see beyond the headlines and connect with other stories about their community.

To those who have made donations, thank you.

To those able to give and share our journalism with others, please Pay it Forward.

The Free Press has shared COVID-19 stories free of charge because we believe everyone deserves access to trusted and critical information during the pandemic.

While we stand by this decision, it has undoubtedly affected our bottom line.

After nearly 150 years of reporting on our city, we don’t want to stop any time soon. With your support, we’ll be able to forge ahead with our journalistic mission.

If you believe in an independent, transparent, and democratic press, please consider subscribing today.

We understand that some readers cannot afford a subscription during these difficult times and invite them to apply for a free digital subscription through our Pay it Forward program.

The Free Press would like to thank our readers for their patience while comments were not available on our site. We're continuing to work with our commenting software provider on issues with the platform. In the meantime, if you're not able to see comments after logging in to our site, please try refreshing the page.

You can comment on most stories on The Winnipeg Free Press website. You can also agree or disagree with other comments. All you need to do is be a Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscriber to join the conversation and give your feedback.

Have Your Say

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press print or digital subscribers only. why?

Have Your Say

Comments are open to The Winnipeg Free Press Subscribers only. why?

By submitting your comment, you agree to abide by our Community Standards and Moderation Policy. These guidelines were revised effective February 27, 2019. Have a question about our comment forum? Check our frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Advertise With Us