In search of a visionary city — at the News Café

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One hundred years ago, before the Great War and the Great Depression, there was a belief among city leaders Winnipeg was the next great thing.

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Hey there, time traveller!
This article was published 18/10/2014 (2909 days ago), so information in it may no longer be current.

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One hundred years ago, before the Great War and the Great Depression, there was a belief among city leaders Winnipeg was the next great thing.

And they were prepared to do whatever it took to get Winnipeg there.

Fast forward through five decades of stagnation and you discover, in the 1960s, a city going through an awakening. There was a sense Winnipeg and Canada were coming of age, triggering a massive building frenzy that spanned all aspects of the city — from the arts to public works.

Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press files View of Portage and Main northward looking up at 201 Portage Ave. and the Richardson Building.

Today, Winnipeg is again garnering global attention — thanks in part to award-winning, ground-breaking architecture. There is a sense, at least in that community, the city is on the cusp of doing great things.

But has that translated to our civic leaders?

Join the Free Press for a discussion on mapping a city vision at the News Café today at 2 p.m.

We will be talking with Gail Asper — the woman who helped make the Canadian Museum for Human Rights a reality — and Susan Thompson — Winnipeg’s first female mayor — to see what they have to say about vision and our city.

The panel will also be streamed live here www.winnipegfreepress.com

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