Mom charged with misleading police in fatal drunk-driving crash

The mother of a man accused in an alleged drunk-driving collision that killed a Winnipeg woman this spring has been charged for misleading investigators.

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The mother of a man accused in an alleged drunk-driving collision that killed a Winnipeg woman this spring has been charged for misleading investigators.

Jordyn Reimer, 24, was acting as a designated driver when a pickup truck crashed into her vehicle at the intersection of Bond Street and Kildare Avenue West around 2:20 a.m. May 1. Fire paramedics pulled her from her vehicle and raced her to hospital but she died of her injuries.

Tyler Scott Goodman, 28, was charged with dangerous driving causing death, driving causing death while impaired, and failing to remain at the scene.

Winnipeg police allege the truck’s driver and occupants fled the scene of the accident.

Laurie Lynn Goodman, 57, was formally charged with obstructing justice and two counts of accessory after the fact Tuesday, when she appeared in court.

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Jordyn Reimer was killed by an alleged impaired driver in a pickup truck that crashed into her vehicle.

“The obstruct charge… pertains to her making a misleading and untruthful statement to the police,” Winnipeg Police Service spokeswoman Const. Dani McKinnon said. “I believe that this was a unique set of circumstances.”

At her court appearance Tuesday, Goodman’s release order was amended to allow her to visit her son’s home when he’s not there, but the full conditions of her release were not available. Her next court date is Sept. 13.

None of the charges against Tyler Goodman or Laurie Goodman have been proven in court.

Reimer’s parents, Doug and Karen Reimer, said Tuesday they hope the occupants of the vehicle face consequences as well.

Doug Reimer said he’s “sickened” the accused’s mother has been accused of misleading investigators.

Jordyn Reimer's memorial site this spring at the intersection of Bond Street and Kildare Avenue West. (Kaitlyn Streilein / Winnipeg Free Press files)

“We did everything to teach our kids to do the right things. This is someone who did none of that,” he said in a tearful interview on the steps of the Winnipeg courthouse.

“Shocked, sickened — and that’s why we’re very relieved that she’s charged.”

A judge granted bail to Tyler Goodman at a Winnipeg hearing May 13. He was ordered to abide by several conditions as part of his $5,000 bail, but details of the hearing are subject to a publication ban. He’s next due in court Sept. 12.

Doug Reimer was careful not to violate that ban Tuesday, but said some of the details are disturbing.

“The appalling part is that these individuals chose that it would be better to get out of there, to try to save their own skin, than try to help,” he said. “I know now from the medical examiner that there was… no help. But still… it’s sickening.”

“Our lives have been shattered. We cannot fix our heartache, we cannot ever fix our loss. We’re just trying to survive, and this family gets to just go about business and go to work.”–Karen Reimer

In an interview by phone Tuesday, Karen Reimer said she is frustrated with the justice system, that the two accused have been released and the gag order imposed on the bail hearing.

“Our lives have been shattered. We cannot fix our heartache, we cannot ever fix our loss. We’re just trying to survive, and this family gets to just go about business and go to work,” she said.

Karen Reimer said she believes Canada’s court system sees driving while impaired as a “soft crime,” and worries the legal outcome won’t be significant.

“We have our trauma and our sadness and our grief, and imposed on top of it, the gasoline of the legal system,” she said.

The family is still learning to cope with the loss of Jordyn, the second-youngest of four daughters.

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Jordyn Reimer (second from right) with her sisters Nikki, Alex and Andi upon her graduation from Edmonton’s MacEwan University in 2021.

“Doug and I talk about our girls, when they move into the future and have happy parts of their lives, how every single happy moment is tarnished because we can’t phone Jordyn, we can’t share it with Jordyn, we can’t tell Jordyn,” Karen Reimer said.

The Transcona Collegiate graduate, who later attended MacEwan University in Edmonton and helped its women’s hockey team to three consecutive championships, worked for Manitoba Public Insurance in Brandon.

Doug Reimer wants the accused punished to the full extent of the law, but said any sentence won’t bring back his daughter.

“But will it ever be enough? No. I can say that unequivocally… It doesn’t matter if they get 10 years… I’ll walk out of the courtroom unhappy… There’ll be no justice.”

erik.pindera@freepress.mb.ca

Twitter: @erik_pindera

Erik Pindera

Erik Pindera
Reporter

Erik Pindera reports for the city desk, with a particular focus on crime and justice.

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