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Books

Prince Harry’s memoir an uneven but revealing look at life under the Royal fishbowl

Reviewed by Ben Sigurdson 6 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Prince Harry’s memoir Spare opens with a poignant epigraph by William Faulkner — “The past is not even dead. It’s not even past.”

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Winnipeg Public Library’s first makers-in-residence share unique skills

AV Kitching 6 minute read Preview

Winnipeg Public Library’s first makers-in-residence share unique skills

AV Kitching 6 minute read Friday, Jan. 20, 2023

An abstract rapper and a letterpress artist are the Winnipeg Library’s first ever makers-in-residence.

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Friday, Jan. 20, 2023

Sean McLachlan will be leading workshops to make postcards using his custom portable letterpress studio. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Struggles of parenthood shine through in Klassen’s subtle, powerful storytelling

Reviewed by Kathryne Cardwell 3 minute read Preview

Struggles of parenthood shine through in Klassen’s subtle, powerful storytelling

Reviewed by Kathryne Cardwell 3 minute read 2:09 AM CST

In this bittersweet work of historical fiction, Manitoba’s Sarah Klassen tells a powerful story that explores childlessness, family and belonging in a Mennonite family, set against the backdrop of the Russian Revolution.

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2:09 AM CST

Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press files

Author Sarah Klassen’s latest novel is set in the community of Friedental, located on the Russian steppes around the time of the Russian Revolution.

Boilermaker toughs it out amongst boys’ club

Reviewed by Joel Boyce 3 minute read Preview

Boilermaker toughs it out amongst boys’ club

Reviewed by Joel Boyce 3 minute read 2:09 AM CST

So what does a boilermaker do? The answer is obvious, but then also it isn’t.

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2:09 AM CST

Thick Skin

Transit rides land author book prize

Bob Armstrong 4 minute read Preview

Transit rides land author book prize

Bob Armstrong 4 minute read 2:09 AM CST

Six months of commuting by public transit in the car-centric city of Dallas inspired Canadian freelancer Samuel Forster to write the manuscript that won the inaugural $10,000 Sutherland House prize for non-fiction book projects.

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2:09 AM CST

Six months of commuting by public transit in the car-centric city of Dallas inspired Canadian freelancer Samuel Forster to write the manuscript that won the inaugural $10,000 Sutherland House prize for non-fiction book projects.

Lee’s rich, liquid prose offers insight into life, pop culture and more in poignant memoir

Reviewed by Laurence Broadhurst 5 minute read Preview

Lee’s rich, liquid prose offers insight into life, pop culture and more in poignant memoir

Reviewed by Laurence Broadhurst 5 minute read 2:09 AM CST

The full title and busy cover of this gripping memoir are rather misleading. A Warhol-esque multi-panelled silkscreen with loud-coloured photos of author Jen Sookfong Lee backdrops all-caps, off-kilter text, together seemingly announcing a tongue-in-cheek romp through pop culture and one person’s frantic emotional connection to it. One picks up the book, marvels at the comically graffitied images, reels from the loud title font and immediately expects a coy take on an almost silly topic.

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2:09 AM CST

Rich Fury / The Associated Press files

Pop culture phenomena such as Rihanna (above) and beloved painter Bob Ross (below) are brilliantly stitched together to help Jen Sookfong Lee pull back the curtains on her experience as a Chinese-Canadian, racism, misogyny and more.

Legendary screenwriter’s intense, thought-provoking memoir details early years and struggle with Alzheimer’s

Reviewed by Bev Sandell Greenberg 3 minute read Preview

Legendary screenwriter’s intense, thought-provoking memoir details early years and struggle with Alzheimer’s

Reviewed by Bev Sandell Greenberg 3 minute read 2:09 AM CST

If you ever watched the hit TV shows NYPD Blue or Deadwood, the name David Milch might be familiar. Not only did he serve as the creator, writer, and executive producer of those series, but they garnered him numerous Emmys. Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2015, Milch has nonetheless penned an intense, thought-provoking memoir about his screenwriting career. At the same time, the story sheds light on his dark side — the extent to which his life was often a two-edged sword.

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2:09 AM CST

Kevork Djansezian / The Associated Press files

In this 2005 photo, David Milch (left) demonstrates how actor Larry Cedar (centre), should pull a cart on the set of Deadwood as actor Peter Jason looks on.

Moorehead’s latest explores the life of Edda Mussolini and the sinister allure of fascism

Reviewed by John K. Collins 4 minute read Preview

Moorehead’s latest explores the life of Edda Mussolini and the sinister allure of fascism

Reviewed by John K. Collins 4 minute read 2:09 AM CST

Caroline Moorehead’s latest book is sabotaged by its subtitle. A prolific author, historian and human rights advocate, Moorehead fails to provide convincing evidence that justifies calling Benito Mussolini’s daughter, Edda,”the most dangerous woman in Europe.” While Edda was certainly well acquainted with the leaders of totalitarian Italy and Germany, there was no shortage of really dangerous women and men in Europe, and she was hardly in their league.

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2:09 AM CST

Public domain / Wikimedia Commons

Edda Mussolini was the eldest child of Benito Mussolini, and became his favourite; her family ties and glamorous lifestyle made her a celebrity.

Logic of wellness subverted in verse

Melanie Brannagan Frederiksen 4 minute read Preview

Logic of wellness subverted in verse

Melanie Brannagan Frederiksen 4 minute read 2:09 AM CST

Midway through his second collection of poems, Dream of Me as Water (Palimpsest, 78 pages, $20), David Ly writes “He tells himself that he doesn’t need to reference/ race, racism, or queerness in his poems,/ yet spirals in guilt when he wishes to simply/ recount feeling at ease after re-arranging/ the décor in his fishtank.”

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2:09 AM CST

Midway through his second collection of poems, Dream of Me as Water (Palimpsest, 78 pages, $20), David Ly writes “He tells himself that he doesn’t need to reference/ race, racism, or queerness in his poems,/ yet spirals in guilt when he wishes to simply/ recount feeling at ease after re-arranging/ the décor in his fishtank.”

New in paper

1 minute read Preview

New in paper

1 minute read 2:09 AM CST

Agatha Christie: A Very Elusive Woman

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2:09 AM CST

Agatha Christie

Story of Berlin’s downfall mainly missing in action

Reviewed by Barry Craig 4 minute read Preview

Story of Berlin’s downfall mainly missing in action

Reviewed by Barry Craig 4 minute read 2:00 AM CST

Taking Berlin has very little to do with it — a more suitable title for Martin Dugard’s war book would be Taking the Buyer.

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2:00 AM CST

Taking Berlin

Evil mastermind returns to destroy Thorne

Reviewed by Nick Martin 3 minute read Preview

Evil mastermind returns to destroy Thorne

Reviewed by Nick Martin 3 minute read 2:00 AM CST

Shudder and tremble and don’t dare breathe — it’s detective inspector Tom Thorne’s turn to be stalked by his own Professor Moriarty.

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2:00 AM CST

The Murder Book

Writer weaves life’s experience into rich, detailed prose

Ben Sigurdson 4 minute read Preview

Writer weaves life’s experience into rich, detailed prose

Ben Sigurdson 4 minute read Thursday, Jan. 26, 2023

In the vast and sometimes-turbulent waters of Canadian literary awards, Nicholas Herring netted quite the catch with his first cast.

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Thursday, Jan. 26, 2023

Herring’s debut novel Some Hellish won the $60,000 Atwood Gibson Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize in November. (Supplied)

Mattea Roach to defend graphic memoir ‘Ducks’ on CBC’s Canada Reads

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Preview

Mattea Roach to defend graphic memoir ‘Ducks’ on CBC’s Canada Reads

The Canadian Press 1 minute read Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2023

TORONTO - "Jeopardy" champ Mattea Roach will go to bat for a graphic memoir on CBC's "Canada Reads" this year.

The on-air literary contest returns March 27, with Roach championing "Ducks" by Nova Scotia author Kate Beaton, which was on former president Barack Obama's list of favourite books of 2022.

Actor-filmmaker Keegan Connor Tracy will argue on behalf of Michael Christie's "Greenwood," while Yukon-based bhangra artist and educator Gurdeep Pandher will defend "Hotline" by Dimitri Nasrallah.

Meanwhile, TikToker Tasnim Geedi will champion "Mexican Gothic" by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, while the actor-director Michael Greyeyes will represent "Station Eleven" by Emily St. John Mandel.

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Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2023

"Jeopardy" champ Mattea Roach, shown in a handout photo, will go to bat for a graphic memoir on CBC's "Canada Reads" this year. The on-air literary contest returns March 27, with Roach championing Kate Beaton's "Ducks." THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-CBC **MANDATORY CREDIT**

‘Fall On Your Knees’ play should make you forget there’s a book: Ann-Marie MacDonald

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Preview

‘Fall On Your Knees’ play should make you forget there’s a book: Ann-Marie MacDonald

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press 5 minute read Monday, Jan. 23, 2023

TORONTO - It's taken a decade to wrestle Ann-Marie MacDonald's sweeping historical novel "Fall On Your Knees" into a theatrical production and now that its tortured Cape Breton characters are being reborn on the stage, so, too, comes their demise on the page.

MacDonald says she hopes the ambitious two-part, six-hour, music-driven show eclipses the source material entirely.

"What I'm really hoping for, and what I anticipate, is that for many people this show will just make them forget that there's a book," she says as the world premiere approaches Thursday in Toronto.

"That'll be success. And that people who never read the book will come to the show and go, 'What? There's a book?'"

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Monday, Jan. 23, 2023

Ann-Marie MacDonald poses in this undated handout photo. It's taken a decade to wrestle Ann-Marie MacDonald's sprawling historical novel "Fall On Your Knees" into a theatrical production and now that its tortured Cape Breton characters are being reborn on the stage, she says she hopes the ambitious two-part, six-hour, music-driven show eclipses the source material entirely. MacDonald credits the play's director, Alisa Palmer, to whom she's married, with driving the page-to-stage transformation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO

Horowitz his own suspect in new thriller

Reviewed by Nick Martin 3 minute read Preview

Horowitz his own suspect in new thriller

Reviewed by Nick Martin 3 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

That devilishly clever murder mystery author Anthony Horowitz has finally got his comeuppance — he’s the prime suspect in the brutal murder of a vile theatre critic, and the police have the goods to put him away for life.

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

The Twist of a Knife

Richardson’s ravishing new novel brings beauty in succinct, striking prose

Reviewed by Sharon Chisvin 3 minute read Preview

Richardson’s ravishing new novel brings beauty in succinct, striking prose

Reviewed by Sharon Chisvin 3 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Canadian author and book designer CS Richardson’s novel, All the Colour in the World, is a beautiful testament to the enduring power and beauty of art and of love.

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Jeff Cheong photo

CS Richardson’s new novel is sparse, intense and innovative, and will leave readers marveling at how he says so much with so few words.

Tater tales will have wee spuds giggling

Helen Norrie 4 minute read Preview

Tater tales will have wee spuds giggling

Helen Norrie 4 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Beginning readers who enjoy humor will chuckle at The Greatest in the World (the first in a series of Tater Tales) by Seattle author Ben Clanton (Simon &Schuster, 88 pages, $16, hardcover).

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Beginning readers who enjoy humor will chuckle at The Greatest in the World (the first in a series of Tater Tales) by Seattle author Ben Clanton (Simon &Schuster, 88 pages, $16, hardcover).

Struggle between rich and poor laid bare in Kapoor’s sophomore fiction

Reviewed by Andrea Geary 5 minute read Preview

Struggle between rich and poor laid bare in Kapoor’s sophomore fiction

Reviewed by Andrea Geary 5 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Deepti Kapoor’s novel Age of Vice opens with a brutal act of violence, in which five innocent people are killed. Because these people are pavement dwellers, asleep on a sidewalk when they are run over, their lives are of little consequence. However, a servant is hauled out of the driver’s seat of the Mercedes and sent to jail. But was he the one at the wheel when the car jumped the curb, or is he taking the fall for someone else?

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Matthew Parker photo

Author Deepti Kapoor effectively creates a world where the rich can buy anything or anyone they want.

Slim volume on climate change an urgent wake-up call to all Canadians

Reviewed by Matt Henderson 5 minute read Preview

Slim volume on climate change an urgent wake-up call to all Canadians

Reviewed by Matt Henderson 5 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

‘The clock is ticking.” Such is the grave warning offered by William Leiss, author of Canada and Climate Change and fellow and past president of the Royal Society of Canada — amongst other designations and credentials.

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Canada and Climate Change

New in paper

1 minute read Preview

New in paper

1 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Chasing History: A Kid in the Newsroom

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Chasing History

Museum’s mysteries marvelous in deft debut

Reviewed by Katrina Sklepowich 3 minute read Preview

Museum’s mysteries marvelous in deft debut

Reviewed by Katrina Sklepowich 3 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

A lush and atmospheric romp replete with medieval magic, sexy intrigue and violent ambition, The Cloisters examines the blurry lines between love and lust, curiosity and obsession and choice and destiny. A stunning debut penned by writer and art history professor Katy Hays, The Cloisters sweeps you up in a dark and mesmerizing world.

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

The Cloisters

Parton helps Indigenous kids get books

Bob Armstrong 4 minute read Preview

Parton helps Indigenous kids get books

Bob Armstrong 4 minute read Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Children on 38 First Nations in Manitoba will receive books this year through a partnership between the Manitoba First Nation Education Resource Centre and Dolly Parton’s Dollywood Foundation.

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Saturday, Jan. 21, 2023

Children on 38 First Nations in Manitoba will receive books this year through a partnership between the Manitoba First Nation Education Resource Centre and Dolly Parton’s Dollywood Foundation.

Penguin Classics, Marvel to issue new editions of 3 comics

The Associated Press 1 minute read Preview

Penguin Classics, Marvel to issue new editions of 3 comics

The Associated Press 1 minute read Thursday, Jan. 19, 2023

NEW YORK (AP) —

Bestselling authors Leigh Bardugo, Jerry Craft and Rainbow Rowell are contributing forewords to new editions of three famed Marvel Comics series.

Penguin Classics is teaming with Marvel on Penguin Classics Marvel Collection, which already includes “Black Panther,” “Captain America” and “The Amazing Spider-Man.”

Three new books will be out Sept. 12: “The Avengers,” with a foreword by Bardugo; “Fantastic Four,” with a foreword by Craft; and “X-Men,” with a foreword by Rowell.

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Thursday, Jan. 19, 2023

This combination of photos released by Penguin Classics shows paperback cover art, left, and hard cover art for "Fantastic Four," the latest edition to the Penguin Classics Marvel Collection. (Penguin Classics via AP)

Ken Follett’s ‘The Armor of Light’ to come out Sept. 26

The Associated Press 1 minute read Preview

Ken Follett’s ‘The Armor of Light’ to come out Sept. 26

The Associated Press 1 minute read Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023

NEW YORK (AP) — Ken Follett is ready to wrap up his epic fictional chronicle of Western civilization.

Viking announced Wednesday that the British author's “The Armor of Light" will be published Sept. 26, concluding an eight-volume series that began in 1989 with “The Pillars of the Earth” and spans 1,000 years. The new book is set in the late 18th-early 19th centuries, the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and centers on the conflicts between Britain and France.

“I’m fascinated by how people have struggled for freedom — and won," Follett said in a statement. "Most of my stories are about just that. The issue underlying 'The Armor of Light’ is freedom of speech.”

Follett's historical novels, which also include “World Without End” and “A Column of Fire,” have sold more than 75 million copies worldwide.

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Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023

This cover image released by Viking shows "The Armor of Light" by Ken Follett, to be published Sept. 26. (Viking via AP)

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