In pictures: Truth and Reconciliation Day in Winnipeg

Since 2013, Sept. 30 has been known as Orange Shirt Day, to honour the children who survived Canada’s Indian residential schools and to remember those who did not return home.

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Since 2013, Sept. 30 has been known as Orange Shirt Day, to honour the children who survived Canada’s Indian residential schools and to remember those who did not return home.

The date is now also the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, which asks all Canadians to reflect upon relationships with Indigenous people, remember the harms of the past, and focus on ways to commit to healthy and positive growth throughout all communities today.

Events marking Truth and Reconciliation Day took place around Winnipeg today.  Here’s how it looked.

Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak Grand Chief Garrison Settee walks through the crowd as people gather for a ceremony at the Oodena Celebration Circle Friday morning at The Forks. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Gerald Abraham, whose traditional name is Blackcloud, from Little Black River First Nation, holds up a sign reading, ”Every Child Matters” Friday morning at The Forks. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Signs laid out on the steps of the Oodena Celebration Circle Friday at The Forks on the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Mel Henderson, a '60s Scoop survivor from Sagkeeng First Nation, waves a flag during the ceremony at the Oodena Celebration Circle Friday morning at The Forks. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Knowledge keeper David Budd speaks at the Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre. (Mikaela MacKenzie / WInnipeg Free Press)
Maurice Fontaine and his daughter, seven-year-old Rylynn Lefort, throw tobacco ties into the sacred fire at Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre on Friday. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)
Mia Wastesicoot, 15 (left), and Sierra Wastesicoot, 16, make tobacco ties at Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre on the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Winnipeg. (Mikaela MacKenzie / Winnipeg Free Press)
Hundreds of people take part in the march towards the convention centre from The Forks Friday morning. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Hundreds of people take part in the march to the RBC Convention Centre from The Forks on Friday. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Rory Nash carries Nathaniel Vandenbroeck, 6, on his shoulders during the march to the convention centre from The Forks on Friday. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Flags were flying as hundreds of people took part in the march to the convention centre on Friday morning. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Hundreds of people take part in the march towards the RBC Convention Centre from The Forks Friday morning on the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
The march from The Forks to the convention centre included hundreds of people. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)
Hundreds of people of all ages took park in the march from The Forks to the convention centre. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Hundreds of people take part in the march towards the RBC Convention Centre from The Forks Friday morning. (Mike Deal / Winnipeg Free Press)

Hannah Lavallee, 6, and brother Tyee, 8, dance during the grand entrance at the second annual Orange Shirt Day Survivors Walk and Pow Wow on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Winnipeg. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
Sherry Starr and Wab Kinew lead the grand entrance at the second annual Orange Shirt Day Survivors Walk and Pow Wow on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Winnipeg on Friday. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
Hundreds of people march through the streets in Winnipeg on Friday. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
People pass the Canadian Museum for Human Rights during the annual Orange Shirt Day Survivors Walk and Pow Wow on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Winnipeg. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
The convention centre in Winnipeg was packed during the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
The Forks was a sea of orange T-shirts on Friday. (John Woods / The Canadian Press)
Mikaela MacKenzie

Mikaela MacKenzie
Photojournalist

Mikaela MacKenzie loves meeting people, experiencing new things, and learning something every day. That's what drove her to pursue a career as a visual journalist — photographers get a hands-on, boots-on-the-ground look at the world.

Mike Deal

Mike Deal
Photojournalist

Mike Deal started freelancing for the Winnipeg Free Press in 1997. Three years later, he landed a part-time job as a night photo desk editor.

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