Shamona Harnett

  • Chronic condition and obesity inspire local woman to join reality show about bodybuilders

    Kim Gallant would do anything to walk upright -- without a cane or a walker -- for more than five minutes at a time. So the 52-year-old Winnipegger is taking action in a way some would consider bizarre.
  • Sweet poison

    More than 1,500 American soldiers lost limbs during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. During that same period, more than 1.5 million people in the United States had their limbs amputated owing to complications of Type 2 diabetes. This startling idea was put forth by primary-care physician Dr. Dean Schillinger in his Oct. 5, 2014, opinion piece for the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Bam (sniff)! Pow (cough)!

    Once you have a cold, fighting it takes some work. Put no effort into the war, and you could end up with a secondary infection that leaves you sick for weeks.
  • Facing the facts about diabetes

    How much do you know about diabetes and why should you care? More than two million Canadians have the condition, says Health Canada. And those numbers are growing -- by 60,000 annually. It's a big deal because of the consequences of diabetes: heart disease and other vascular complications.
  • Experts from across North America gather in city for professional conference on diabetes

    Insulin-producing stem cells that reverse Type 1 diabetes. Gut bacteria that control blood-sugar levels.
  • 'Yuck! I hate that!'

    Lately, yellow foods can make Myrddin Wiltshire, 6, burst into tears. "Not too long ago we had a chicken-flavoured rice cooked in a chicken broth," says his mother, Margaret Wiltshire, a Winnipeg office manager. "He sat at the table and cried."
  • Nutrition whiz? Take our quiz

    You eat a healthy breakfast every morning, try to limit your sugar intake and follow the headlines on health. But do you really know all your nutrition facts?
  • The bitter truth

    Artificial sweeteners could be spiking blood sugar levels -- the very problem they are often used to prevent -- according to new research published last Wednesday in the journal Nature. In the study, Israeli researchers fed mice the most widely used sweeteners: aspartame, sucralose and saccharine. The mice that consumed the fake sugar had increased glucose intolerance, another term for high blood sugar levels.
  • The breakfast test

    You're rushing to get your children ready and out the door so they can make it to school on time. A sit-down breakfast is the furthest thing from your mind as you pop frozen waffles in the toaster and feed them to your kids while you comb their hair and get them dressed.
  • Eat by example to take fuss out of food time

    THEY were both hungry, cranky and teary-eyed. But they refused to eat the food available -- a healthy, tasty soup and a savoury watermelon salad. Instead, one kid wanted cheese quesadillas -- hold the vegetables -- and the other wanted a piece of candy from the jar sitting on the kitchen counter.
  • Blasting away at concussions

    A team of Winnipeg researchers is the first in the world to blast the brain with controlled levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen in a quest to develop a definitive test to diagnose concussions. The cutting-edge work appears in the current edition of Plos One, a peer-reviewed, online medical journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS).
  • Massage therapist on call to help ease labour pains, support birthing mothers

    A woman with her feet spread apart in stirrups -- sweat dripping from her brow -- moans in pain while the doctor urges her to breathe and push. It's the popular image that comes to mind when thinking about a woman in labour.
  • Proposed daily limits, labelling rules to give consumers better handle on sugar intake

    Three glasses of orange juice or two small containers of vanilla yogurt would set you at your daily sugar limit if Health Canada's proposal pans out. Last week, the federal agency announced its plans to set a daily limit on sugar intake as well as revamp nutrition labels so consumers can easily spot how much of the sweet stuff manufacturers have added to packaged foods.
  • Your health, your info

    In a 1996 episode of the classic sitcom, Seinfeld, Elaine sneaks a peek at her medical file while waiting alone on an examination table in her doctor's office. "Difficult?" she reads aloud, as she discovers that a medical staffer once described her with the unfavourable adjective and wrote it down in her file. That's when her physician walks in and scolds her.
  • Despite struggling with lung disease, Winnipeg's Ian Fish plans to scale B.C. mountain

    As a little boy, Ian Fish would lie, frightened, in a plastic oxygen tent, while his mother reached into its zippered opening to hold his hand. Back then, in the late 1960s, the young boy would battle asthma with visits to the hospital several times a year for oxygen treatments -- a way to help his lungs get the air they needed. It's an experience that Fish, now 52, can't forget.
  • Companies are coming clean about claims their products promote healthy lifestyles

    Last week, Dr. Mehmet Oz faced tough questions from American lawmakers during a hearing on deceptive advertising and weight-loss scams. The celebrity host of TV's popular The Dr. Oz Show -- and Harvard-educated heart surgeon -- admitted during questioning that many of the products he promotes on his show "don't have the scientific muster to pass as fact" even if he "believes in" and uses them.
  • Marathon runners have to worry about more than mere muscle pain

    German-born runner Uta Pippig made history in 1996 when she won the Boston Marathon for the third consecutive year. Her win seems even more spectacular considering she crossed the finish line of that race with diarrhea dripping down her legs for all to see, including a live television audience. If you completed Sunday's Manitoba Marathon, you know what running 26 miles (42 kilometres) does to your body.
  • Winnipeg centre a leading authority on disease-fighting fare

    Food manufacturers from across North America will flock to Winnipeg this week to learn how to create disease-busting products while cutting their costs. The conference, called Western Canadian Functional Food Ingredients: Strategies to Manage Costs and Enhance Products, takes place Wednesday and Thursday at the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods (RCFF), at University of Manitoba's Smartpark.
  • Obesity problem getting obscene

    ‘PARTS of the world are quite literally eating themselves to death,” declared World Health Organization directorgeneral Dr. Margaret Chan earlier this month during a speech at the agency’s World Health Assembly in Geneva. "Our children are getting fatter," Chan went on to say, noting she has established a "high-level commission" on ending childhood obesity.
  • It can be tough to navigate the nutrition maze

    Are you proud of your nutrition knowledge? Are you certain that you know everything about what you should eat? It's time for a pop quiz that will put your knowledge to the test.
  • Sneaky food companies use deceptive language to sell their less-than-healthy products

    Last week, Kellogg announced it would no longer use the terms "All Natural" and "Nothing Artificial" on its Kashi products. The move stems from a class-action settlement in which the company will pay out $5 million for allegedly misleading people with its claims on some of its Kashi-labelled products.
  • Trading processed foods for healthy spring produce can help banish your blahs

    You spent the winter hibernating, eating poorly and complaining about the cold. It not shocking that you're feeling tired, heavy and out of shape. Ready to break out of your lethargy and spring forward into good health?
  • A charter for all Types

    For someone who does not have diabetes, Peggy Archer understands it too well. The retired Dauphin teacher became an expert on the metabolic condition after her grandson, Dylan, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 8.
  • Slash those sweets

    Do you drink a glass of juice a day? If so, you're likely ingesting too much sugar, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Earlier this month, WHO, the United Nations' global health watchdog, announced its proposed plans to lower its sugar-consumption guidelines from 10 per cent of daily caloric intake to below five per cent. It's encouraging governments around the world to do the same.
  • Winnipegger passionate about creating custom breasts for women who've lost theirs to cancer

    Wendy Smith has crafted just about every external body part imaginable -- legs, fingers, toes, noses, arms, ears. But the certified prosthetist and clinical anaplastologist is most passionate about her breast work: recreating lifelike breasts for women who have lost them to cancer.

Poll

Now that former cabinet minister Theresa Oswald has entered the NDP leadership race, do you believe the "gang of five" rebel ministers were right to publicly criticize Premier Greg Selinger's leadership?

View Results

Ads by Google