Shamona Harnett

  • Proposed daily limits, labelling rules to give consumers better handle on sugar intake

    Three glasses of orange juice or two small containers of vanilla yogurt would set you at your daily sugar limit if Health Canada's proposal pans out. Last week, the federal agency announced its plans to set a daily limit on sugar intake as well as revamp nutrition labels so consumers can easily spot how much of the sweet stuff manufacturers have added to packaged foods.
  • Your health, your info

    In a 1996 episode of the classic sitcom, Seinfeld, Elaine sneaks a peek at her medical file while waiting alone on an examination table in her doctor's office. "Difficult?" she reads aloud, as she discovers that a medical staffer once described her with the unfavourable adjective and wrote it down in her file. That's when her physician walks in and scolds her.
  • Despite struggling with lung disease, Winnipeg's Ian Fish plans to scale B.C. mountain

    As a little boy, Ian Fish would lie, frightened, in a plastic oxygen tent, while his mother reached into its zippered opening to hold his hand. Back then, in the late 1960s, the young boy would battle asthma with visits to the hospital several times a year for oxygen treatments -- a way to help his lungs get the air they needed. It's an experience that Fish, now 52, can't forget.
  • Companies are coming clean about claims their products promote healthy lifestyles

    Last week, Dr. Mehmet Oz faced tough questions from American lawmakers during a hearing on deceptive advertising and weight-loss scams. The celebrity host of TV's popular The Dr. Oz Show -- and Harvard-educated heart surgeon -- admitted during questioning that many of the products he promotes on his show "don't have the scientific muster to pass as fact" even if he "believes in" and uses them.
  • Marathon runners have to worry about more than mere muscle pain

    German-born runner Uta Pippig made history in 1996 when she won the Boston Marathon for the third consecutive year. Her win seems even more spectacular considering she crossed the finish line of that race with diarrhea dripping down her legs for all to see, including a live television audience. If you completed Sunday's Manitoba Marathon, you know what running 26 miles (42 kilometres) does to your body.
  • Winnipeg centre a leading authority on disease-fighting fare

    Food manufacturers from across North America will flock to Winnipeg this week to learn how to create disease-busting products while cutting their costs. The conference, called Western Canadian Functional Food Ingredients: Strategies to Manage Costs and Enhance Products, takes place Wednesday and Thursday at the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods (RCFF), at University of Manitoba's Smartpark.
  • Obesity problem getting obscene

    ‘PARTS of the world are quite literally eating themselves to death,” declared World Health Organization directorgeneral Dr. Margaret Chan earlier this month during a speech at the agency’s World Health Assembly in Geneva. "Our children are getting fatter," Chan went on to say, noting she has established a "high-level commission" on ending childhood obesity.
  • It can be tough to navigate the nutrition maze

    Are you proud of your nutrition knowledge? Are you certain that you know everything about what you should eat? It's time for a pop quiz that will put your knowledge to the test.
  • Sneaky food companies use deceptive language to sell their less-than-healthy products

    Last week, Kellogg announced it would no longer use the terms "All Natural" and "Nothing Artificial" on its Kashi products. The move stems from a class-action settlement in which the company will pay out $5 million for allegedly misleading people with its claims on some of its Kashi-labelled products.
  • Trading processed foods for healthy spring produce can help banish your blahs

    You spent the winter hibernating, eating poorly and complaining about the cold. It not shocking that you're feeling tired, heavy and out of shape. Ready to break out of your lethargy and spring forward into good health?
  • A charter for all Types

    For someone who does not have diabetes, Peggy Archer understands it too well. The retired Dauphin teacher became an expert on the metabolic condition after her grandson, Dylan, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 8.
  • Slash those sweets

    Do you drink a glass of juice a day? If so, you're likely ingesting too much sugar, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Earlier this month, WHO, the United Nations' global health watchdog, announced its proposed plans to lower its sugar-consumption guidelines from 10 per cent of daily caloric intake to below five per cent. It's encouraging governments around the world to do the same.
  • Winnipegger passionate about creating custom breasts for women who've lost theirs to cancer

    Wendy Smith has crafted just about every external body part imaginable -- legs, fingers, toes, noses, arms, ears. But the certified prosthetist and clinical anaplastologist is most passionate about her breast work: recreating lifelike breasts for women who have lost them to cancer.
  • Let's get physical

    Scientists say it can send you into an endorphin-induced state of bliss. So it makes sense that such an activity -- exercise -- can benefit your relationship with your significant other.
  • A closer look at supposedly bug-busting supplements

    It's been six or seven months since I've had a cold. But according to a review of cold remedies published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal last week, vitamin C (one of the supplements I take regularly) has little if anything to do with warding off the common bug.
  • She ain't heavy, 'cuz of her brother

    Kelly Zelinsky hated being 33. More than just another sign of time passing by, it was a sad reminder of her brother, Jon. The young man with Type 2 diabetes had died of a massive heart attack -- at the very same age -- just a few years before.
  • Quest for health

    You're on a mission in 2014 to lessen your intake of french fries and cupcakes in favour of foods that fuel your body with energy and nutrients. While that's an admirable goal, are you certain you know enough about what foods are best for your health?
  • Fads are out, realistic health trends are in for 2014

    Bouncy stretches while wearing leg warmers. Exercise belts that promised to melt away fat. The revelation that eating low-fat food was the magic formula for instant weight loss. Thankfully, health and fitness trends seem to be less faddish and a little more down-to-earth these days.
  • Food guide decried

    Kristin Bartkiw had one goal in mind when she sent information to a well-known health blogger about her child's daycare: To encourage Canadians to question Canada's Food Guide. She feels the federally endorsed document in many ways fails to set healthy standards for eating. "This is something I have been passionate about and frustrated about," Bartkiw says in an interview from her home in Rossburn, 315 kilometres west of Winnipeg.
  • Crackers? Or nuts?

    Home-cooked roast beef, carrots, potatoes, milk and an orange. It's a made-in-Manitoba lunch that elicited international headlines last week from media outlets, including CNN and London's Daily Mail. The story starts with Rossburn mother Kristen Bartkiw, who packed her children just those foods for lunch, knowing that she was sending them to school with a fairly nutritious meal.
  • Infectious disease specialist bugged by the flu

    You're washing your hands like a surgeon, eating your vegetables and trying to stay away from people who may be sick with the flu. But is it enough to get you through the influenza season uninfected?
  • Scraping away at wound-care myths

    I'm nursing a fairly serious and painful scrape after a trip-and-fall accident left me knee-first on the dusty ground of my condo's parking garage. I could blame the moderately high wedge-heeled boots I wore the evening of the mishap, but the reality is, since childhood, I have always been a bit prone to falling. (I need to improve my balance.)
  • Winnipeg oncology nurse named best in country for dedication to patients

    Jodi Hyman doesn't consider the treatment room at CancerCare Manitoba a depressing place, even as heavy-duty chemotherapy drugs drip into the bloodstreams of her patients. To the Winnipeg oncology nurse, it's a unique place where volunteers play their guitars and help patients create art.
  • Don't scan and click: think inside the box

    As a family member reached for an item off the grocery store shelf, I pointed out that it probably wasn't the most nutritious option to take home to her children. Translation: "Keep that so-called food out of your grocery cart because I know it's swimming in sugar and it's vitamin-deficient, especially considering the thimble-sized container it comes in."
  • From insomnia to depression, health-care professionals are embracing the Internet as a resource for patients

    Psychologist Dr. John Walker is used to his patients arriving at their sessions with pages of information they've printed off from the Internet. But the University of Manitoba professor and director of the St. Boniface General Hospital anxiety disorders program doesn't seem to mind.

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